Browse Prior Art Database

THE DISCRETE, LOGICAL DESIGN, SIMULATION SYSTEM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128387D
Original Publication Date: 1970-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-15

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Guskin, J.R.: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The Discrete, Logical Design, Simulation System is a relatively straightforward, high-speed method for simulating combinatorial and delay logic. Such a programming system would provide a relatively quick way for the logic designer to determine any flaws in his network. He can, thus, debug his design and immediately test his corrections. The programs are structurally divided into four main parts: the Command Language Interpreter, the Data Structure Manipulation Routines, the Simulator and various specialized input and output routines which communicate directly with the data structure routines. The primary programming language used was the System/360 G-level assembler language; however, we used the FORTRAN IV G-level compiler along with an extended runtime system to write the Command Language Interpreter because it enabled us to quickly and inexpensively make alterations to the program. The algorithm which allowed the construction of a very fast simulator is described under the section dealing with the "Ordering Algorithm".

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 9% of the total text.

Page 1 of 22

THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

THE DISCRETE, LOGICAL DESIGN, SIMULATION SYSTEM

J.R. Guskin T.J. Dingwall

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Memorandum 26

CONCOMP: Research in Conversational Use of Computers F.H. Westervelt, Project Director ORA Project 17449

supported by: ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE WASHINGTON, D.C.

CONTRACT NO. DA-49-083 OSA-3050 ARPA ORDER NO. 716

administered through: OFFICE OF RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION ANN ARBOR April 1970

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. Introduction.....1
2. Command Language Interpreter..... 2
3. The Data Structure.....5
4. The Ordering Algorithm.....11
5. The Simulator..... 13
6. Possible Additions and Extensions to the Current System.....15
Appendix A. Syntax of Initialization.....A-1
Appendix B. Basic Information Commands.....B-1
Appendix C. Data Structure Manipulation Commands.....C-1
Appendix D. Stored Program Control Commands.....D-1
Appendix E. Other Commands.....E-1
Appendix F. System Subroutines.....F-1
Appendix G. Sample Run.....G-1
Appendix H. Modifications and Additions to Data-Structure Routines.....H-1

1. INTRODUCTION

The Discrete, Logical Design, Simulation System is a relatively straightforward, high-speed method for simulating combinatorial and delay logic. Such a programming system would provide a relatively quick way for the logic designer to determine any flaws in his network. He can, thus, debug his design and immediately test his corrections.

University of Michigan Page 1 Apr 01, 1970

Page 2 of 22

THE DISCRETE, LOGICAL DESIGN, SIMULATION SYSTEM

The programs are structurally divided into four main parts: the Command Language Interpreter, the Data Structure Manipulation Routines, the Simulator and various specialized input and output routines which communicate directly with the data structure routines. The primary programming language used was the System/360 G-level assembler language; however, we used the FORTRAN IV G-level compiler along with an extended runtime system to write the Command Language Interpreter because it enabled us to quickly and inexpensively make alterations to the program.

The algorithm which allowed the construction of a very fast simulator is described under the section dealing with the "Ordering Algorithm."

2. COMMAND LANGUAGE INTERPRETER

A highly interactive and versatile command language interpreter was included in the package as an interface between the programs themselves and the user. The commands are designed to be simple to use and quickly expandable. A complete error-detection system has been incorporated so that the user needn't worry about "blowing the system down." He is reminded, if he forgets, for example, that certain signal and package names have been used before. Besides this interactive mode there is a stored command mode and a batch mode, which allow a whole data-structure (network) to be efficiently loaded into the system.

The CLI consists of three primary parts: the Parser, the Input Cont...