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MAN-COMPUTER SYNERGISM FOR DECISION MAKING IN THE SYSTEM DESIGN PROCESS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128403D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-15

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

John J. Allan III: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The subject of this dissertation is the engineering design process. The purpose of the investigation was to delineate some basic implementation principles for a computer-based interactive design system which would enable the designer to be more effective in his work. The thesis of the work is: design tasks must be done within time and economic constraints. A designer makes his decisions based on his best available information which is, in part, a function of how well he can communicate with his environment. His information interchange with his environment can be facilitated with the proper computer interface, thus allowing the designer an opportunity to make a greater number of effective decisions per unit time. More decisions per unit time means that some otherwise ignored or grossly estimated component interactions of the system which the designer is deigning may now be evaluated more quantitatively. To the extent that the design process has been identified, a design system to augment the effort of the engineering designer is postulated. An implementation of the postulated design system has been built and used. The conceptual method of operation is described in Chapter 5. The implementation is discussed in the Appendices. This research itself was approached using the methodology of Chapter 2. The original needs statement was: ";What does it take to do a better job of designing a complex, realworld system?"; The key elements of an answer to that question seem to be: 1) a fast graphical way of manipulating design problem topologies, 2) an implementation of the Vari-port link concept, 3) an associative central computer data structure for speed, and 4) a file-oriented central computer system to provide adaptability. Some ";solved engineering problem results"; are discussed in Chapter 6, along with several aspects of the relevance of the work to practicing engineers. Conclusions and some open problems are presented in Chapter 7.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

MAN-COMPUTER SYNERGISM FOR DECISION MAKING IN THE SYSTEM DESIGN PROCESS

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Technical Report 9 John J. Allan III

CONCOMP: Research in Conversational Use of Computers F.H. Westervelt, Project Director ORA Project 07449

supported by: ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE WASHINGTON, D.C.

CONTRACT NO. DA-49-083 OSA-3050 ARPA ORDER NO. 716

administered through: OFFICE OF RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION ANN ARBOR June © John James Allan, III, 1968 All Rights Reserved

PREFACE

The subject of this dissertation is the engineering design process. The purpose of the investigation was to delineate some basic implementation principles for a computer-based interactive design system which would enable the designer to be more effective in his work.

The thesis of the work is: design tasks must be done within time and economic constraints. A designer makes his decisions based on his best available information which is, in part, a function of how well he can communicate with his environment. His information interchange with his environment can be facilitated with the proper computer interface, thus allowing the designer an opportunity to make a greater number of effective decisions per unit time. More decisions per unit time means that some otherwise ignored or grossly estimated component interactions of the system which the designer is deigning may now be evaluated more quantitatively.

To the extent that the design process has been identified, a design system to augment the effort of the engineering designer is postulated. An implementation of the postulated design system has been built and used. The conceptual method of operation is described in Chapter 5. The implementation is discussed in the Appendices.

This research itself was approached using the methodology of Chapter 2. The original needs statement was: "What does it take to do a better job of designing a complex, realworld system?" The key elements of an answer to that question seem to be:

1) a fast graphical way of manipulating design problem topologies,
2) an implementation of the Vari-port link concept,

University of Michigan Page 1 Jun 01, 1968

Page 2 of 67

MAN-COMPUTER SYNERGISM FOR DECISION MAKING IN THE SYSTEM DESIGN PROCESS

3) an associative central computer data structure for speed, and
4) a file-oriented central computer system to provide adaptability.

Some "solved engineering problem results" are discussed in Chapter 6, along with several aspects of the relevance of the work to practicing engineers. Conclusions and some open problems are presented in Chapter 7.

This research was carried out with the cooperation and assistance of many people. The author is most grateful for the advice, continuous interest and counsel received from the members of his doctoral committee. The author is especially indebted to his Chairman, Professor Frank Westervelt, for his friendly encouragement, helpf...