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Network Models for the Conversational Design of Stochastic Service Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128406D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-15

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Wallace, Victor L.: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Numerical analysis of Markovian queueing networks, and graphical communication of problem statements and results, offer a potential for truly conversational use of computers for ";high-traffic"; design of largescale systems. However, one must develop a translator which converts the pictorial language of queueing network diagrams to the data structures required for efficient numerical analysis. This requires the development of new mathematical models for networks, and for the meaning of their components. Such mathematical models are explored, and their role in the development of adequate programming systems is described. These models, algebraic in form, provide a vehicle for the information conveyed directly by the diagram, the information implicit in the symbology of the diagram, the information upon which the actual calculations are performed, and the procedure which transforms the information from the form of the diagram to the form for calculation.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Network Models for the Conversational Design of Stochastic Service Systems

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Technical Report 13 Victor L. Wallace Keki B. Irani

CONCOMP: Research in Conversational Use of Computers
F. H. Westervelt, Project Director ORA Project 07449

supported by: ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE WASHINGTON, D.C.

CONTRACT NO. DA-49-083 OSA-3050 ARPA ORDER NO. 716

administered through: OFFICE OF RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION ANN ARBOR November 1968

ABSTRACT

Numerical analysis of Markovian queueing networks, and graphical communication of problem statements and results, offer a potential for truly conversational use of computers for "high- traffic" design of largescale systems. However, one must develop a translator which converts the pictorial language of queueing network diagrams to the data structures required for efficient numerical analysis. This requires the development of new mathematical models for networks, and for the meaning of their components. Such mathematical models are explored, and their role in the development of adequate programming systems is described.

These models, algebraic in form, provide a vehicle for the information conveyed directly by the diagram, the information implicit in the symbology of the diagram, the information upon which the actual calculations are performed, and the procedure which transforms the information from the form of the diagram to the form for calculation.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ABSTRACT.....iii
LIST OF FIGURES.....vii
1. INTRODUCTION.....1
2. THE TRANSLATION PROCESS.....5
3. ELECTRIC NETWORKS: A PARTIAL ANALOGY.....14

University of Michigan Page 1 Nov 01, 1968

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Network Models for the Conversational Design of Stochastic Service Systems

4. DESCRIPTION OF QUEUEING NETWORK DIAGRAMS.....24
5. A MODEL FOR THE MATRIX STRUCTURE.....27
6. A NETWORK TECHNOLOGY.....33
7. EQUIVALENCE AND CONSOLIDATION.....41
8. A MODEL FOR THE SYMBOL SEMANTICS.....44
9. CONCLUSIONS.....51
REFERENCES.....53

LIST OF FIGURES

2.1 A Simple NetworkDiagram.....5
2.2 A Less Trivial Network Diagram.....6
2.3 Functional Diagram of a Graphic Conversational Programming System for Networks.....8
3.1 An Electric Network.....14
3.2 Defining Branch Voltage and Current.....19
3.3 An Equivalent Network to Figure 3.1.....21
7.1 Some Nonprimitive Elements.....42
7.2 An Equivalent Network.....42

NETWORK MODELS FOR THE CONVERSATIONAL DESIGN OF STOCHASTIC SERVICE SYSTEMS

V. L. Wallace
K. B. Irani

[ Chapter ] 1. INTRODUCTION

It is frequently desirable to design stochastic service systems which cannot be adequately analyzed by normal queueing theoretic models. Such systems consist, in the most usual instances, of numerous waiting lines (or "queues"), servers, and controlling or directing stations which determine the discipline of task flow through the system. These systems are often realistic representations, for high-traffic design purpose...