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SELCIR: SYSTEMS ENGINEERING LABORATORY CIRCUIT-DRAWING PROGRAM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128423D
Original Publication Date: 1970-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-15
Document File: 20 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Blinn, James F.: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

SELCIR, Systems Engineering Laboratory Circuit Drawer, enables the user to draw electronic circuit diagrams on a CRT display. All graphical manipulations are performed locally in a PDP-9, which, together with a 339 display scope, forms a remote terminal to an IBM 360/67. SELCIR scans the drawn network and transmits the topology of the network diagram to the central computer. The 360 then analyzes the network and sends back results which are displayed in the form of graphs. To enable the user to express himself naturally, the graphical manipulations emphasize the use of the light pen rather than push buttons. Also the user can stop at any point to correct mistakes or make changes. Finally, many constraints on the drawing process enable him to quickly make a neat looking diagram.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 7% of the total text.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

SELCIR: SYSTEMS ENGINEERING LABORATORY

CIRCUIT-DRAWING PROGRAM [ front matter and title page ]

James F. Blinn CONCOMP: Research in Conversational Use of Computers F.H. Westervelt, Project Director, ORA Project 07449 supported by: ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY,DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

CONTRACT NO. DA-49-083 OSA-3050, ARPA ORDER NO. 716 administered through: OFFICE OF RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION ANN ARBOR, July 1970

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ABSTRACT.....v
1. INTRODUCTION.....3
2. USER'S MANUAL.....2
2.1 Background Material.....2
2.1.1 Light Pen.....2
2.1.2 Light Buttons and Light Switches.....3
2.1.3 Getting SELCIR on the Air.....3
2.2 Creating Circuit Elements.....4
2.3 Operations on Existing Elements.....6
2.3.1 Move.....6
2.3.2 Delete.....6
2.3.3 Rotate.....6
2.3.4 Assign Value.....8
2.3.5 Assign Control.....8
2.3.6 Connect.....9
2.4 Abnormal Conditions during Diagram Drawing.....15
2.5 Summary of Drawing Operations.....15
2.6 Diagram Translation.....17
2.7 Teletype Operation.....19
2.8 Diagram Output and Results Specification.....20
2.9 Abnormal Conditions during Output Specification.....26
2.10 Network Description Format.....27
3. INTERNAL OPERATION.....30
3.1 Tasks.....30
3.1.1 Keyboard Input Interpreter.....30
3.1.2 Dataphone Input Interpreter.....31
3.1.3 Push Button Interpreter.....31
3.1.4 Light Pen Service Tasks.....32
3.1.4.1 Diagram Service Tasks.....32
3.1.4.2 Light Buttons.....33
3.1.4.3 Light Switches.....34
3.2 Thresholding.....35
3.2.1 Move or Branch.....35
3.2.2 Delete.....36

University of Michigan Page 1 Jul 01, 1970

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SELCIR: SYSTEMS ENGINEERING LABORATORY CIRCUIT-DRAWING PROGRAM

3.2.3 Rotate.....37
3.2.4 Line Drawing.....38
3.2.5 Line Initiation.....39
3.3 Data Structure.....42
3.4 Connection Initiation and Adjustment.....50
4.POSSIBLE FUTURE EXPANSIONS.....59
REFERENCES.....61

ABSTRACT

SELCIR, Systems Engineering Laboratory Circuit Drawer, enables the user to draw electronic circuit diagrams on a CRT display. All graphical manipulations are performed locally in a PDP-9, which, together with a 339 display scope, forms a remote terminal to an IBM 360/67. SELCIR scans the drawn network and transmits the topology of the network diagram to the central computer. The 360 then analyzes the network and sends back results which are displayed in the form of graphs. To enable the user to express himself naturally, the graphical manipulations emphasize the use of the light pen rather than push buttons. Also the user can stop at any point to correct mistakes or make changes. Finally, many constraints on the drawing process enable him to quickly make a neat looking diagram.

1.INTRODUCTION

This report describes the operation of SELCIR, first from the user's point of view (an operator's manual), and second from the programmer's point of view (a programming manual).

Section 2 (User's Manual) describes the basic operation of the hardware and the...