Browse Prior Art Database

LOW-COST INTERACTIVE IMAGE PROCESSING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128499D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-16
Document File: 6 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Emily G. Johnston: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This paper describes how to do useful, nontrivial image processing tasks interactively using only a standard alphanumeric CRT terminal, or.even a teletype. Only an ordinary time-sharing system is required; there is no need for a dedicated computer or channel, or even for special priority on the system. The support of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Contract F44620-72-C-0062 is gratefully acknowledged, as is the help of Eleanor B. Waters in preparing this paper.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

LOW-COST INTERACTIVE IMAGE PROCESSING

Emily G. Johnston Azriel Rosenfeld

ABSTRACT

This paper describes how to do useful, nontrivial image processing tasks interactively using only a standard alphanumeric CRT terminal, or.even a teletype. Only an ordinary time-sharing system is required; there is no need for a dedicated computer or channel, or even for special priority on the system.

The support of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Contract F44620-72-C-0062 is gratefully acknowledged, as is the help of Eleanor B. Waters in preparing this paper.

Introduction

The advantagesof interactive processing over batch processing are by n I Qw well established. when working in an interactive mode, the programmer obtains quick responses to his actions, and does not have to reconstruct his line of reasoning each time a response is obtained. This is especially important when the data being processed are graphical or pictorial; it is of great benefit to be able to see the results of each processing step displayed immediately. In addition, it is crucial to be able to point to objects in the dis- play, or outline regions in the display, in such a way that the computer knows.which objects or regions are intended; this ability is impossibly cumbersome to achieve in batch mode.

Low-cost interactive graphics terminals are now widely avail-able, but one bears much less about interactive image processing systems. Of the available computer image displays, only the more expensive permit any sort of interaction, suchas pointing, out-lining, or selective modification.

This paper.describes an approRch to interactive image processing using'only a standard alphanumeric CRT terminal--or if necessary, even a teletype.-This approach can be implemented on any ordinary time-sharing system; it does not require a dedicated computer, a dedicated channel,, or even special priority on the system.

Input

Digitized images, even of.moderate size, contain enormous numbers of ):>its; for example, a commercial TV picture contains about 50Q by 500 resolvable point$, and if.we represent the gray level of each point.by a 6-bit number, we have 11-2 million bits in the picture.: For this reason, it has often been suggested that, when doing image processing on a computerone should not digitize the entire image and input it to the computer; ratherone should allow the computer to control a scanning device which can read and digitize selected,portions of the

University of Maryland Page 1 Dec 31, 1972

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LOW-COST INTERACTIVE IMAGE PROCESSING

image on demand. If this suggestion'is accepted, it implies a major hardware expense before the image processing* itself can even begin.

.Fortunately, there are alternatives to the computer-controlled scanner approach, provided that one is willing to trade 1/0 time for hardware-cost. A digitized TV picture occupies only a few yards of magnetic tape; one Can store...