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The Implementation of Centralized Services in Resource-Sharing Computer Networks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128528D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-16
Document File: 10 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

G. Michael Schneider: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This paper describes a model for the :implementation of centralized services within a distributed resource-sharing computer network. It first describes existing models for the requisite lower level transmission and interprocess communication protocols and then utilizes them in constructing the model for a Centralized. Network Services (CNS) Protocol. It is hoped that this model can serve as a paradigm to the network designer for the implementation of a wide range of vital network services.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

The Implementation of Centralized Services in Resource-Sharing Computer Networks

by

G. Michael Schneider

Computer, Information, and Control Sciences

Institute of Technology

University of Minnesota

Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

Technical Report 75-16 September, 1975 Cover courtesy of Ruth and Jay Leavitt

The Implementation of Centralized Services in Resource-Sharing Computer Networks by G. Michael Schneider

Computer, Information, and Control Sciences University of Minnesota Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

Abstract

This paper describes a model for the :implementation of centralized services within a distributed resource-sharing computer network. It first describes existing models for the requisite lower level transmission and interprocess communication protocols and then utilizes them in constructing the model for a Centralized. Network Services (CNS) Protocol. It is hoped that this model can serve as a paradigm to the network designer for the implementation of a wide range of vital network services.

I. Introduction

There is an enormous user interest, as demonstrated by the current literature, in the area of distributed, resource-sharing computer networks. (See, for example, [1,2,3]) Ideally these networks allow a user to access programs, data, and/or hardware facilities from any node in the network as easily as local resources. Most current resource-sharing networks (e. g. ARPANET, CYCLADES, or MERIT) are implemented as value-added networks in which there exist two distinct and organizationally independent components. The HOSTS are the creators and consumers of all network messages; the communication subnetwork is responsible for supporting the actual transmission of messages as well as providing a wide range of what may be termed utility services. (See Fig. 1) This subnetwork can be viewed in a way analogous to the U.S.' Postal Service. A HOST "drops" a message into the subnetwork for delivery to the HOST at a remote site. The specific method of delivery and the route that the message takes are almost always unknown to either the source or desti-nation HOST. Like the Postal Service many of the services which the subnetwork must provide to the HOSTS are beat implemented

University of Minnesota Page 1 Dec 31, 1975

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The Implementation of Centralized Services in Resource-Sharing Computer Networks

at either one or, at most, a small set of nodes within the: network. While this centrali-zation of services will cause some additional network traffic, and thus a slight decrease in effective line utilizatian,it is still quite attractive in a value-added network for the following reasons:

1) The support, documentation, and maintenance of the service can be centralized, thus avoiding the duplication costs involved with a support staff at each node . 2) Because of the organizational independence between the HOSTS and subnetwork we cannot distribute any subnetwork processin...