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Interactive Systems: Patterns and Prospects

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128538D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-16
Document File: 10 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

W.K. Giloi: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Presently, the bulk of interactive systems are educational and commercial time sharing systems. With the advent of inexpensive stand-alone CRT terminals with computing power as, for example, the IBM System/51, programmable in BASIC or even APL, the emphasis of interactive computing will shift to computer aided design systems, computer aided training systems, interactive systems for image processing, interactive data management systems, etc. On the hardware side, microprocessors will provide an inexpensive, way of equipping terminals with "local intelligence", and nove, "non-von Neumann" computer architectures will provide a much improved hardware support for interactive languages that will feature more adequate control constructs and data structures. These developments are .discussed in detail. This paper was invited for presentation at the 1976 International IBM Symposium on INTERACTIVE SYSTEMS, Sept. 22-24 in Bad Homburg, Germany.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Interactive Systems: Patterns and Prospects

by

W.K. Giloi

Department of Computer Science

114 Lind Hall

Institute of Technology

University of Minnesota

Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

Technical Report 76-4 April, 1976 Cover design courtesy of Ruth and Jay Leavitt nteractive Systems: Patterns and Prospects

by W.K. Giloi

Abstract

Presently, the bulk of interactive systems are educational and commercial time sharing systems. With the advent of inexpensive stand-alone CRT terminals with computing power as, for example, the IBM System/51, programmable in BASIC or even APL, the emphasis of interactive computing will shift to computer aided design systems, computer aided training systems, interactive systems for image processing, interactive data management systems, etc. On the hardware side, microprocessors will provide an inexpensive, way of equipping terminals with "local intelligence", and nove, "non-von Neumann" computer architectures will provide a much improved hardware support for interactive languages that will feature more adequate control constructs and data structures. These developments are .discussed in detail. This paper was invited for presentation at the 1976 International IBM Symposium on INTERACTIVE SYSTEMS, Sept. 22-24 in Bad Homburg, Germany.

1. Introduction

In the beginning was ENTAC, the monstrous :17,500 tube calculator. Then came von Neumann and invented the stored program computer. Multiprogramming allowed the optimal utilization of the resources of a computer system and thus the maximi-zation of the program throughput. The next turn of the "wheel of incarnation" (Sutherland) brought the interactive terminal, together with the time-sharing mode of operation, which would give everyone who could pay for it (or who might be lucky enough to find a sponsor who would pay for it) his personal, programmable calculator, trading productivity for accessibility. Dialog systems, providing access to a computer via a terminal, are a great tool for editing, testing, and debugging programs. However, they also constitute a very inefficient way of executing a program. Hence, if the main objective is the

University of Minnesota Page 1 Dec 31, 1976

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Interactive Systems: Patterns and Prospects

maximization of performance and throughput, this can be achieved only through batch processing, be it given in its classical form or in the more convenient form of remote batch entry. If the main purpose is educational, interactive. time sharing systems have gained tremendous merits. There already exist, in these United States, generations of high school and college students who owe their initiation into computing to the existence of time sharing terminals. Already in the junior high schools our children are taught the basic notions of algorithms, programming and computing. (As a side effect, there also exists already a generation of parents who had to spend some of their...