Browse Prior Art Database

IMPLEMENTING SIMULATION LANGUAGES THROUGH SIMULATION LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128603D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-16
Document File: 11 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Gary E. Lindstrom: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A study investigating the use of simulation languages to support their own implementation is described. Originating within a broader undertaking dealing with the definition of programming language control structures, this work reports on a series of language extension experiments, proceeding by a process of interpretive self description. These experiments, conducted within a framework of successively generalized versions of LISP, lead to a model of a modern simulation language. Theoretical and practical benefits are assessed and related to a current project utilizing SIMULA-67 for the implementation of a conversational simulation programming system. A condensed version of this paper was presented at the 7th Annual Pittsburgh Conference on Modeling and Simulation, held April 26-27, 1976.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 11% of the total text.

Page 1 of 11

THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

IMPLEMENTING SIMULATION LANGUAGES THROUGH SIMULATION LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING

Gary E. Lindstrom and Sallie S. Nelson

May 20, 1976

Department of Computer Science University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, Pa. 1.5260

NSF Report NSF OCA GJ .42348 IMPSIM

This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under grant DCR 73-03441 A01.

1. ABSTRACT

A study investigating the use of simulation languages to support their own implementation is described. Originating within a broader undertaking dealing with the definition of programming language control structures, this work reports on a series of language extension experiments, proceeding by a process of interpretive self description. These experiments, conducted within a framework of successively generalized versions of LISP, lead to a model of a modern simulation language. Theoretical and practical benefits are assessed and related to a current project utilizing SIMULA-67 for the implementation of a conversational simulation programming system.

A condensed version of this paper was presented at the 7th Annual Pittsburgh Conference on Modeling and Simulation, held April 26-27, 1976.

2. MOTIVATION

The task of implementing a large programming language system is greatly facilitated by the use of a suitable higher level programming language. Whether the processor is purely interpretive, purely compilational, or (as is usually the case) a mixture of both aspects, the advanced data structures, expressions, and control forms found in a modern higher level programming language make such a language greatly preferable to assembly language programming for implementation purposes.

In this p aper we assess the merits of using one class of higher level languages for the specific task of implementing simulation language processors. That particular class of implementation languages is, once again, simulation languages. Our broad objective here is generally to appraise the utility of simulation languages for such reflexive programming task, and to distinguish two aspects of such merit.

First, how do the generally comprehensive programming facilities offered by a modoern simulation language make such a language attractive for implementation tasks in general? Secondly, what features specific to simulation languages make them particularly attractive for the specific task of implementing simulation languages? Originaing within a larger undertaking dealing with the definition of control structures in programming languages [1], this work has an

University of Pittsburgh Page 1 Dec 31, 1976

Page 2 of 11

IMPLEMENTING SIMULATION LANGUAGES THROUGH SIMULATION LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING

applicational motivation the design and implementation of a prototype conversational simulation language system [2]. P ag e 3

3* METHODS OF LANGUAGE DESCRIPTION,

The successful imple6entation of a Programming language entails its operational description in one (or a combin...