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REPRESENTING THE ORIENTATION OF DENDRITIC FIELDS WITH GEODESIC TESSELATIONS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128606D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-16
Document File: 20 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

C.M. Brown: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The orientation properties of a population of three-dimensional vectors may be described by using "geodesic dome"-like constructions as the basis for histograms of the data. This work is complementary to past efforts to describe the orientation of structures of (undirected) rods and presages future work in statistical tests on vector data. An application to neuroanatomy is discussed, and two computer systems for acquisition/analysis and analysis/display of such data are described.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

REPRESENTING THE ORIENTATION OF DENDRITIC FIELDS WITH GEODESIC TESSELATIONS

C.M. Brown Computer Science Department The University of Rochester

TR The orientation properties of a population of three-dimensional vectors may be described by using "geodesic dome"-like constructions as the basis for histograms of the data. This work is complementary to past efforts to describe the orientation of structures of (undirected) rods and presages future work in statistical tests on vector data. An application to neuroanatomy is discussed, and two computer systems for acquisition/analysis and analysis/display of such data are described.

The preparation of this paper was supported in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency of the De-partment of Defense, and was monitored by ONR under Contract No. N00014-75-C- 1091; and in part by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation under Grant No. 74--~12~-5.

Contents

1. The Problems.

1.1. Dendritic Orientation.

1.2. Computer Analysis of Neuronal Structure.

1.3. Macrostructure and Microstructure.

2. The Solutions.

2.1. Macrostructure and Principal Components. 2.2. Microstructure and the 3-D Histogram of Directions. 2.3. The Future.

3. The Systems.

3.1. Acquisition of Data and Macrostructure Analysis.

3.2. Microstructure Analysis and Display of Results.

4. The Techniques.

4.1. The Icosahedron.

4.2. The Principal Polyhedral Triangle.

4.3. The Faceted Polyhedron.

4.4. The Representation.

4.5. Hidden Lines.

University of Rochester Page 1 Dec 31, 1976

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REPRESENTING THE ORIENTATION OF DENDRITIC FIELDS WITH GEODESIC TESSELATIONS

5. The Summary.

The Problems.

One of the difficulties in understanding the function of the brain is that it is like nothing so much as -a lump of porridge.

1.1. Dendritic Orientation.

In this paper we explore the concept of the "orientation" of the dendritic field of a neuron. In this Section we will say why the concept of-dendritic orientation may be important, how computers are being used to aid in quantititive work in neuroanatomy, and what aspects of orientation we are trying to get at with our measures.

The thought that some concept such as "dendritic orientation" may be important arises from:

1) the theory that the arrangement and extent of a neuronts synapses are correlated with its trigger features.

2) the fact that a topological ordering is preserved from the retina to the lateral geniculate nucleus to the visual cortex. Thus LGN terminals I P rojecting from retinal cells adjacent along some axis would contain synapses with the dendritic field of a visual neuron that lie on an axis identifiable with the axis on the retina.

3) the evidence that there is neural plasticity in some developing (or even adult [Creutzfeldt and Heggelund]) organisms. The functional properties of individual neurons, such as the orientation of their visual field [Hubel and Wiesell, can be modified by controlling for a time the classes...