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A Database foundation for Process Specifications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128660D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-16
Document File: 24 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Neil M. Goldman: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

I

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 6% of the total text.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

A Database foundation for Process Specifications

Neil M. Goldman David S. Wile

ISIIRR-80-84 October 1980 llv'FORaiAT10N SCIENCES INSTITUTE

46'6 Adlllll',lll )' Way/~tarilm del Re y/Cali f nruia 00201

C`NIVERSITY OF SOL'7 HrRjN~ CALIFORNIA ( 2l i ) 82'-1 5l I

THIS RESEARCH IS SUPPORTED BY THE DEFENSE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY UNDER CONTRACT NO. DAHC15 72 C 0308, ARPA ORDER NO. 2223. VIEWS AND CONCLUSIONS CONTAINED IN THIS REPORT ARE THE AUTHORS' AND SHOULD NOT BE INTERPRETED AS REPRESENTING THE OFFICIAL OPINION OR POLICY OF DARPA, THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, OR ANY PERSON OR AGENCY CONNECTED WITH THEM.

CONTENTS

Acknowledgments in

1. Introduction I

2. Specifying the Domain of a Process 2 2.1 Objects and Types 3 2.2 Relations 2.3 Expressions, Patterns, and Predicates S 2.4 Constraints R ?..5 nerived Relationships R

3. Specifying the Dynamics of a Process )0

3.1 Control Structures II

3.2 Actions L?

3.3 Procedural Requirements 14

3.4 Data Triggered Processing IS

3.5 Temporal Reference 17

3. Process Granularity 19

3.7 Constraints and Non-Determinism 21

3.8 Anomaly Control 24

4. Conclusion 24

References 27

University of Southern California Page 1 Dec 31, 1980

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A Database foundation for Process Specifications

IV

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The Ideas presented in this report arose during lengthy discussions within a closely knit group of colleagues. As such, the individual contributions of the group members are impossible to identify. The authors would like to acknowledge the major influence on this work of other members of this group, consisting of Bob Balzer, Lee Erman, Martin Feather, and Phil London.

I. INTRODUCTION

A major effort is tinder way within computer science to design new languages that will enhance the development of reliable and maintainable software, particularly for large applications. Through careful structuring [13J and encapsulation [17J of information, some new Programming languages permit hierarchical development of large programs. Each layer of the hierarchy Is understandable in terms of properties abstracted from modules in the lower layers. From the definitions of the modules at the base of the hierarchy, a compiler can (or could) produce an acceptable implementation of the entire system.

Another line of development has been a search for languages with more expressive power than is provided In programming languages [6, 9, 16J. The designers of these specification languages are willing to forego the ability to have their specifications mechanically compilable into (efficient) implementations. In return, they hope to make it easier to write a formal specification of a process and, more important, to increase the likelihood that the process specified is indeed the one desired.l

Balzer and Goldman [2J enumerate several language principles claimed to be beneficial for both the creation and maintenance of large software systems. These include the requirem...