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The ISI Experimental Multimedia Mail System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128664D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-16
Document File: 9 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Jonathan B. Postel: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

With multimedia computer mail, a user may create messages containing text, image, and voice data and send such messages to other users within a computer network. This paperdescribesthe development, implementation, and use of one such system. The following five sections describe the overview of the system, the system model, the presentation model, the multimedia mail program from the user's point of view, and plans for future work.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

The ISI Experimental Multimedia Mail System

Jonathan B. Postel Gregory G. Finn Alan R. Katz Joyce K. Reynolds

Introduction

With multimedia computer mail, a user may create messages containing text, image, and voice data and send such messages to other users within a computer network. This paperdescribesthe development, implementation, and use of one such system. The following five sections describe the overview of the system, the system model, the presentation model, the multimedia mail program from the user's point of view, and plans for future work.

3: Presentation Model

A multimedia message may contain several streams of data. The message composer must have sufficient control to coordinate the display of theses streams in order to effectively communicate his ideas to the recipient. This is accomplished by incorporating explicit sequencing controls into the body of the message. Also important is the ability to control where data is to be placed when it is displayed. Postel, Finn, Katz, & Reynolds [Page 71

3.1. Sequence Control

In a text-only system, message content is displayed serially from start to finish. Since there is only one medium, it makes no sense to consider parallel presentation of data streams. In multimedia mail, however, there may be several streams which together make up the message. For example, a voice-over may accompany a picture, or text may annotate a map. It would disrupt a message and make it more difficult to understand if the voice-over preceded the picture, or if the annotations appeared before the map image. A mechanism is needed to allow the message composer to control the sequencing of the message parts during the presentation.

Sequence control is accomplished by constructing a multimedia message from a sequence of presentation descriptors. Each presentation descriptor is a property-list containing a sequencing property name. The property value is a list of presentation elements which contain the media- specific data and display information, or, for complex messages, a list of further presentation descriptors.

When a presentation descriptor is independent, the composer is indicating that the presentation order of the presentation elements contained in the list is not important. If voice-over accompanies a picture, the picture and voice data presentation elements can be grouped under the simultaneous property. When the text must appear after an image, the sequential property is used.

3.2. Data Placement

University of Southern California Page 1 Dec 31, 1986

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The ISI Experimental Multimedia Mail System

Three distinctly different UIP models for the display of data have been examined through experimental implementations. In the first-generation UIP, a specific area of the screen was reserved for each different medium (voice, image, and text) [12,20,21 ]. This was found to be cumbersome for several reasons. First, not all the media...