Browse Prior Art Database

System Installation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128790D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Dec-08
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-19
Document File: 7 page(s) / 89K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Adobe Systems Inc.: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Periodically, System software on the Macintosh ® can become corrupted, slowing down applications or causing random bombs and freezes. Although it is difficult to trace the true cause of System corruption, sometimes the best strategy for getting the System up and running again may be to reinstall the operating System software.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 21% of the total text.

Page 1 of 7

THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1994 Adobe Systems, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Reproduced with permission. Adobe makes no warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of this material and hereby disclaims any responsibliity therefor.

System Installation

System Installation -- Tech Note #4900 (12/8/93)Macintosh ®

Periodically, System software on the Macintosh ® can become corrupted, slowing down applications or causing random bombs and freezes. Although it is difficult to trace the true cause of System corruption, sometimes the best strategy for getting the System up and running again may be to reinstall the operating System software.

TECHNICAL EXPLANATION

System hangs and bombs occur for many reasons. Faulty memory allocation or ROM routine conflicts are the most common causes. Memory allocation is controlled by the System file. In some cases, ROM routines can be redirected or completely replaced by INITs (also referred to as Extensions) during startup. If the System file is damaged, insufficient memory could be assigned to applications or INITs, causing programs to quit unexpectedly, and generating Bad F-Line or Type 1 and Type 3 error messages. Also, resources like pictures or menus might be damaged or unavailable for applications, causing similar problems. INITs may make propri-etary calls to the System file that, assuming the System file is functioning correctly, do not allow specific inits to load before or immediately after other INITs.

System corruption can happen at any time. Sometimes crashes occur immediately after the corruption occurs; other times minor or no symptoms are initially evident. Occasionally, only after loading new INITs or programs does the corruption become evident. Although it may thus appear as if the new program or INIT caused the problem, it is possible that the new INIT or application is merely the first program that needs to interface with the portion of the System file that is already corrupted.

INIT CONFLICTS

The first strategy for resolving System problems is first to check if there are corrupt or conflict- ing INITs causing trouble. See the technical note "INIT Conflicts" for a complete description of troubleshooting INIT problems. If these steps fail to solve your problem, reinstall your System as described in this technical note.

RUNNING THE APPLE ® SYSTEM INSTALLER

The Apple Operating System installer is designed to replace or update only System resources.

It does not affect third-party INITs, desk accessories, or Chooser documents that may be loaded in your System folder, nor does it affect third-party applications during its execution. The installer will look for any folder, on the target volume, that contains at least a Finder file and a System file. If no such folder is found, the installer looks for any folder, on that volume, named System Folder and then updates that folder. New System resources are automatically placed within that folder.

Adob...