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PREPARATION OF INPUT FOR THE LINEAR PROGRAMMING CODE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128840D
Original Publication Date: 1956-Aug-07
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-19
Document File: 5 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Judd, H.A.: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This paper describes the format of alphabetic and decimal input cards, their loading sequence and the resulting output of the Data Assembly code. The input to the linear programming code varies from the alphabetic identification card to the 10 digit fixed point elements of the matrix with a specified index for both row and column. Necessarily, the Data Assembly program must be all things to all types of input, so it is general and flexible enough to handle the varied information, but this data must be in a prescribed order for a successful assembly. There are four basic options which must be specified in what is called a SENSES card, which may be considered the last binary card of the Data Assembly program. The first option is whether the input is from the on-line card reader or the off- line card reader (i.e. the peripheral card-to-tape equipment). The second option specifies whether the matrix element cards are punched in variable or fixed format, which I will explain later. The third option allows the operator to instruct the program to punch the contents of the matrix tape into binary cards for permanent storage. The fourth option controls punching of initial constants, basis headings and tel. Without discussing the ramifications of these options now, let me say they are made by the presence or absence of a punch in the first 4 columns of the left word in the 9's row of the SENSES card. The first piece of data to be loaded is an identification card. The contents of this card are used for identification on all the printed outputs associated with the particular Job The Data Assembly program converts it to binary form and punches out a binary card suitable for reloading with the main LP code. Thus any alphabetic or numeric information can be used for identification. The next card to be read is the parameter card which must contain the parameters: M Number of restraint equations, max M = 255 Z Number of phase I's desired q Total number of phases Σ Index of sum row τ Number of preliminary transformations. Since there are only 5 numbers appearing on the parameter card, ten columns were allowed for each number. Thus columns 1 - 10 contain M, 11 - 20 contain Z, 21 - 30 contain q, etc. Also, these numbers are 1, 2 or 3 digits at most. They should be punched in the high order columns of each field since the conversion program stops searching for information as soon as it encounters a blank column. Thus, if it is desirable to punch in fixed fields, it is necessary to punch leading zeros. The number 030 is identical to 30 if both numbers are punched in the leftmost columns defining a field.

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Page 1 of 5

THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

PREPARATION OF INPUT FOR THE LINEAR PROGRAMMING CODE1

by


H. A. Judd

International Business Machines Corp. P-914
August 7, 1956

The RAND Corporation 1700 MAIN ST., SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA

SUMMARY

This paper describes the format of alphabetic and decimal input cards, their loading sequence and the resulting output of the Data Assembly code. The input to the linear programming code varies from the alphabetic identification card to the 10 digit fixed point elements of the matrix with a specified index for both row and column. Necessarily, the Data Assembly program must be all things to all types of input, so it is general and flexible enough to handle the varied information, but this data must be in a prescribed order for a successful assembly.

There are four basic options which must be specified in what is called a SENSES card, which may be considered the last binary card of the Data Assembly program. The first option is whether the input is from the on-line card reader or the off- line card reader (i.e. the peripheral card-to-tape equipment). The second option specifies whether the matrix element cards are punched in variable or fixed format, which I will explain later. The third option allows the operator to instruct the program to punch the contents of the matrix tape into binary cards for permanent storage. The fourth option controls punching of initial constants, basis headings and tel. Without discussing the ramifications of these options now, let me say they are made by the presence or absence of a punch in the first 4 columns of the left word in the 9's row of the SENSES card.

The first piece of data to be loaded is an identification card. The contents of this card are used for identification on all the printed outputs associated with the particular Job The Data Assembly program converts it to binary form and punches out a binary card suitable for reloading with the main LP code. Thus any alphabetic or numeric information can be used for identification.

The next card to be read is the parameter card which must contain the parameters: M Number of restraint equations, max M = 255 Z Number of phase I's desired q Total number of phases Σ Index of sum row τ Number of preliminary transformations.

Since there are only 5 numbers appearing on the parameter card, ten columns were allowed for each number. Thus columns 1 - 10 contain M, 11 - 20 contain Z, 21 - 30 contain q, etc. Also,

1 Prepared for The RAND Corporation Short Course in Computational Aspects of Linear Programming, September 4 - 13, 1956.

Rand Corporation Page 1 Aug 07, 1956

Page 2 of 5

PREPARATION OF INPUT FOR THE LINEAR PROGRAMMING CODE

these numbers are 1, 2 or 3 digits at most. They should be punched in the high order columns of each field since the conversion program stops searching for information as soon as it encounters a blank column. Thus, if it is desirable to punch in fixed fields, it is necessa...