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An experience teaching a graduate course in cryptography

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128849D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Feb-02
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-19
Document File: 12 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Rubin, Aviel D.: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes an experience of teaching a graduate-level course in cryptography and computer security at New York University. The course content as well as lessons learned and plans for the future are discussed.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 10% of the total text.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

©; 1996 Aviel D. Rubin. All Rights Reserved. Used with permission.

An experience teaching a graduate course in cryptography

Aviel D. Rubin 1

rubin@bellcore.com

Bellcore 445 South St.
Morristown, NJ

Abstract

This article describes an experience of teaching a graduate-level course in cryptography and computer security at New York University. The course content as well as lessons learned and plans for the future are discussed.

1 Introduction

This paper describes a course titled "Cryptography and Computer Security" that was taught at New York University in the Fall of 1995. The department head at NYU requested a course for practitioners, with an emphasis on applications and real-world problems. Thus, there were four phases to the course, classical cryptography, conventional cipher systems, applications of cryptography, and number theory. Grading was based on five homework sets and a semester project. The course used Bruce Schneier's book, Applied Cryptography 2as the primary text, which was supplemented by a course pack of selected publications. In addition, materials were used from the following books: Doug Stinson's, Cryptography: Theory and Practice,3 Dorothy Denning's Cryptography and Data Security,4 Garfinkel and Spafford's Practical Unix Security,5 Kaufman, Perlman and Speciner's Network Security,6 and William Stalling's Network and Internetwork Security Principles and Practice.7

The cryptography and computer security course was offered in the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences (http://cims.nyu.edu/) on Tuesday evenings from 5-7, and consisted entirely of graduate students. Some of them had full-time jobs during the day, and were taking

1 Author web page: ftp://thumper.bellcore.com/pub/rubin/rubin.html

2 [ 38 ] Bruce Schneier. Applied Cryptography- Protocols, Algorithms, and Source Code in C. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1994.

3 [ 41 ] Douglas Stinson. Cryptography: Theory and Practice. CRC Press, Inc, 1995.

4 [ 13 ] Dorothy Denning. Cryptography and Data Security. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1983.

5 [ 16 ] Simson Garfinkel and Gene Spafford. Practical Unix Security. O'Reilly & Associates, Inc., 1991.

6 [ 24 ] Charlie Kaufman, Radia Perlman, and Mike Speciner. Network Security: Private communication in a public world Prentice Hall, 1995.

7 [ 39 ] William Stallings. Network and Internetwork security. Prentice Hall, 1995.

Bellcore Page 1 Feb 02, 1996

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An experience teaching a graduate course in cryptography

courses at night. There were 20 registered students, about 10 auditors who showed up regularly, and a teaching assistant.

One idea for the class that came from Stuart Haber, who teaches a cryptography course at Columbia, was somewhat successful. Each lecture was assigned at least one student scribe. The scribe was responsible for taking careful notes and producing a write-up of the lecture, which was then shared with the class. The students...