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CLIP A compiler Language for Information Processing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128853D
Original Publication Date: 1959-Oct-19
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-19
Document File: 4 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Isbitz, Harold: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

1. A type declaration specifies the type and size of unsubscripted variables. Each I is an identifier of a variable and each μ defines the type and size of the I's immediately following it. In the example shown, variables A and B would be signed, two-digit integers, as indicated by the presence of the ";+"; sign, the number ";2"; and the letter ";D";, respectively. Similarly C and D characters, E, F. and G would be Boolean, and H would be an unsigned, three-digit integer.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

CLIP A compiler Language for Information Processing

CLIP CONTAINS FOUR DATA DECLARATIONS: (Fig.


1)

1. A type declaration specifies the type and size of unsubscripted variables. Each I is an identifier of a variable and each µ defines the type and size of the I's immediately following it.

In the example shown, variables A and B would be signed, two-digit integers, as indicated by the presence of the "+" sign, the number "2" and the letter "D", respectively. Similarly C and D characters, E, F. and G would be Boolean, and H would be an unsigned, three-digit integer.

     2. A Table declaration specifies the subscripted variables or items which make up a table. The declaration may also specify initial values which the items are to possess. J is the identifier of the table, and C is an unsigned integer whose value specifies the number of entries in the table. The entries are numbered consecutively starting from one. The I's are the identifiers of the items which make up the table, and the µ as in a type declaration, specify the type and size of the items. The D's, which may be omitted, specify the initial values which the items are to contain. If present, the D's must be listed for each entry in the same sequence in which the I's are listed.

The example shown defines a table called TAB comprising three entries, each entry containing values for items W. X, and Y. W [ 1 ] would contain the characters FLEAS, X [ 1 ] would contain the number 39, Y [ 1 ] would contain the number 29, W [ 2 ] would contain the characters G blank HAS blank, and so on. Getting ahead of myself I would like to point out how this declaration would be translated for the IBM 709. Notice from the diagram beneath the declaration that more than one item may occupy a machine word. This has been done in an effort to economize on storage space, and to save input-output transfer time. Notice also that the table is arranged in parallel fashion; that is, all the values for a particular item are contiguously located. This has been done for greater ease in indexing.

3. A string declaration specifies up to 120 character positions. J is the identifier of the string, and C is an unsigned integer whose value Specifies the number of characters in the string. µ is an unsigned integer followed by the letter "H". The integer portion of µ specifies the number of D's where each D is a character. An expression of the form J [ C':C" ] is called a string variable and refers to the C'th through C"th character positions of the string J.

In the example shown, CHAR, is a string of ten characters composed of the first ten letters of the alphabet. CHAR [ 7:9 ] is an expression referring to the substring containing the letters GHI.

System Development Corporation Page 1 Oct 19, 1959

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CLIP A compiler Language for Information Processing

The string and string variable were devised in order to avoid the necessity for rigid input and...