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Three-Dimensional Graphical User Interface and Effects for Windows and Menus on Digital Televisions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129134D
Publication Date: 2005-Sep-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 131K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that uses three-dimensional graphics to enhance the graphical user interface (GUI) for digital televisions (DTV). Benefits include showing more information and functionality without confusing the user.

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Three-Dimensional Graphical User Interface and Effects for Windows and Menus on Digital Televisions

Disclosed is a method that uses three-dimensional graphics to enhance the graphical user interface (GUI) for digital televisions (DTV). Benefits include showing more information and functionality without confusing the user.

Background

A typical DTV has one or more basic video planes where the video is decoded and displayed, and one or more graphics overlay planes used for text. It also has user interface items (e.g. menus and control feedbacks). There is a blending of all of these elements to create the final plane which the user sees on the display.

General Description

The disclosed method enhances the GUI for DTV by using a three-dimensional “graphics overlay” (see Figure 1). This approach is an important differentiator providing a new level of “look and feel” for DTV.

Picture-in-Pictures:

The user selects a picture-in-picture (PiP) mode to be activated. Instead of the usual “instant on” window appearing in the TV screen foreground, a video plane is decoded and converted to a “texture”. This texture is mapped to a geometric object (e.g. a rectangle). The rectangle is then flipped, rotated, or bent to create the desired effect, as well as animated to appear on the graphics plane as a moving object. It finally appears flat (i.e. flush) on the graphics plane and is viewed as another panel on the TV, at this moment the video feed can begin rendering the video to the same location on the TV screen without the graphics engine involved. During this process, the desired video stream can be continuously converted to textures to create the desired video effect of moving pictures in the graphics overlay.

The user can also request an input on the remote. A semi-transparent geometric object is created in the graphics realm, in this example a sphere, with a two-dimensional menu mapped onto it. The sphere can appear as a pinpoint growing in size, and lighting effects on the object can give it the appearance of a three-dimensional object on the TV screen. Finally, when the sphere is the correct size (e.g. filling the screen) it is flattened to become a rectangle, which appears as a flush panel to the background video; the user then uses the remote to make the selections.

Multiple PiPs for PVR (personal video recording):

The GUI may show a three-dimensional object with several previously recorded show...