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IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 2 Number 1 -- Front Matter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129329D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

IEEE Computer Society: OWNER

Abstract

Most writing on the history of computing tends to focus on developments in the United States. These have been of considerable importance, of course, but the computing field has sometimes taken its direction from international developments that have not always received their proper share of attention. This issue of the Annals focuses on some of the significant European computing projects. In this issue Martin Campbell-Kelly reports on the work at Cambridge University in the 1940s. Under the leadership of Maurice Wilkes, the foundations were laid for a number of programming concepts and techniques that are still in use. The concept of subroutines, as codified by Wilkes, Wheeler, and Gill in their famous book on EDSAC, is essentially unchanged today. A companion article by Campbell-Kelly on the University of Manchester will follow in another issue of the Annals. In a second article about work outside the United States, R. W. Marczynski discusses the computing activities in Poland in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Here we see the efforts of a few dedicated mathematicians brought to fruition in a country very recently torn by a devastating war. Building computers in that environment was indeed a remarkable accomplishment.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1980 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc., Volume 2, Number 1, January 1980. Used with permission.

Annals of the History of Computing Volume 2, Number 1, January 1980 [Front Matter]

Contents About this issue.....3 Preserving Computer-Related Source Material.....4

Articles Programming the EDSAC: Early Programming Activity at the University of Cambridge - Martin Campbell-Kelly.....7 The First Seven Years of Polish Digital Computers - R. W.
Marczynski.....37 A Trilogy on Errors in the History of Computing - N. Metropolis and J.
Worlton.....49 Computer Advances Pioneered by Cryptologic Organizations - Samuel S.
Snyder.....60 The Charles Babbage Institute for the History of Information Processing.....71
Activities of AFIPS History of Computing Committee.....75

Departments News and Notices.....76 Meetings in Retrospect.....79 Comments, Queries, and
Debate.....83 Reviews.....88 Contributions..... [Material omitted]

About this Issue

Most writing on the history of computing tends to focus on developments in the United States. These have been of considerable importance, of course, but the computing field has sometimes taken its direction from international developments that have not always received their proper share of attention. This issue of the Annals focuses on some of the significant European computing projects.

In this issue Martin Campbell-Kelly reports on the work at Cambridge University in the 1940s. Under the leadership of Maurice Wilkes, the foundations were laid for a number of programming concepts and techniques that are still in use. The concept of subroutines, as codified by Wilkes, Wheeler, and Gill in their famous book on EDSAC, is essentially unchanged today. A companion article by Campbell-Kelly on the University of Manchester will follow in another issue of the Annals.

In a second article about work outside the United States, R. W. Marczynski discusses the computing activities in Poland in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Here we see the efforts of a few dedicated mathematicians brought to fruition in a country very recently torn by a devastating war. Building computers in that environment was indeed a remarkable accomplishment.

A third article presents an interesting view of historical writing. N. Metropolis and J. Worlton report on three instances of incorrect interpretations of historical events, and in so doing they provide insight into a process that they believe hist...