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IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 2 Number 2 -- Front Matter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129336D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

IEEE Computer Society: OWNER

Abstract

Although the field of computers and information processing is very young, we are already saying farewell to some of our pioneers. In this issue we recognize the contributions of John Mauchly and John Curtiss, two important leaders in the early years of modern computing who have recently died. The loss of these pioneers emphasizes the need for recording and documenting as much of the history of computing as we can. The contributions of John Mauchly, whose life and work are described in this issue by Nancy Stern, have been considered several times in the early pages of the Annals, both in articles and in comments clarifying those articles. John Curtiss is recognized in this issue, not only by John Todd's memorial, but also by Harry Huskey in his article on the SWAC computer. Curtiss played a prominent role in developing SWAC, as well as in the general computer activities of the National Bureau of Standards. The SWAC paper, which grew out of the 1978 AFIPS Pioneer Day session on SWAC, describes how that computer was commissioned and built. SWAC was a ";one-of-a-kind"; computer that was an important step along the road toward modern computer systems -- in its software tools as well as its design. The AFIPS Pioneer Day planned for the National Computer Conference in May 1980 will recognize the twenty-fifth anniversary of the founding of SHARE, a very significant development in the early days of our industry. SHARE brought users and vendors together to cooperate and exchange ideas and programs. It led the way for other user groups, and in so doing shaped the computer industry for years afterward. In this issue we present a talk given by Paul Armer in 1956, just after SHARE had begun to function effectively. In discussing how SHARE was founded, Armer conveys the enthusiasm and excitement that brought people together from many different organizations, realizing what could be accomplished if they would work cooperatively.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1980 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc., Volume 2, Number 2, April 1980. Used with permission.

Annals of the History of Computing Volume 2 Number 2 April 1980 [Front Matter]

Contents About this Issue.....99

Articles John William Mauchly, 1907-1980 - Nancy Stern.....100 John Hamilton Curtiss, 1909-
1977 - John Todd.....104 The National Bureau of Standards Western Automatic Computer
(SWAC) - Harry D. Huskey.....111 SHARE -- A Eulogy to Cooperative Effort - Paul Armer.....122
Programming the Mark l: Early Programming Activity at the University of Manchester - Martin Campbell-Kelly.....130 The Printed Papers of Charles Babbage - Alfred W. Van Sinderen.....169

Departments Anecdotes.....186 Comments, Queries, and Debate.....186 Reviews.....187

Guidelines for Authors..... [Material omitted]

About this Issue

Although the field of computers and information processing is very young, we are already saying farewell to some of our pioneers. In this issue we recognize the contributions of John Mauchly and John Curtiss, two important leaders in the early years of modern computing who have recently died. The loss of these pioneers emphasizes the need for recording and documenting as much of the history of computing as we can.

The contributions of John Mauchly, whose life and work are described in this issue by Nancy Stern, have been considered several times in the early pages of the Annals, both in articles and in comments clarifying those articles. John Curtiss is recognized in this issue, not only by John Todd's memorial, but also by Harry Huskey in his article on the SWAC computer. Curtiss played a prominent role in developing SWAC, as well as in the general computer activities of the National Bureau of Standards. The SWAC paper, which grew out of the 1978 AFIPS Pioneer Day session on SWAC, describes how that computer was commissioned and built. SWAC was a "one-of-a-kind" computer that was an important step along the road toward modern computer systems -- in its software tools as well as its design....