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SHARE A Eulogy to Cooperative Effort

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129340D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-05
Document File: 11 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

PAUL ARMER: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The year 1980 is not only the beginning of a new decade, it is also the twenty-fifth year of what many consider the modern era of data processing. Among the many historically significant events that occurred in 1955 was the creation and founding of SHARE, the first computer user group. In 1956, shortly after the first anniversary of SHARE, Paul Armer delivered the following talk at the Electronic Business Systems Conference in San Francisco, sponsored by the National Machine Accountants Association, which subsequently changed its name to the Data Processing Management Association. Paul says that his principal motive for the talk was to stimulate and encourage the formation of a user group for the IBM 7021705. (In those days the IBM 701 and 704 were considered ";scientific"; or ";engineering"; machines, and the 702 and 705 were thought of as ";business"; or ";administrative"; machines.) Paul was recruited in this sales effort by Jack A. Strong, the first chairman of SHARE. Jack was responsible for both engineering and administrative computing at North American Aviation in those days and wanted the benefits of a user group for the administrative side of the house -- benefits similar to those he had observed coming from SHARE for the engineering side. The conspiracy was successful in that shortly thereafter GUIDE was organized for the IBM 7021705 users.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 8% of the total text.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1980 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc., Volume 2, Number 2, April 1980. Used with permission.

SHARE A Eulogy to Cooperative Effort

PAUL ARMER

(Image Omitted: © 1980 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or pan of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Author's present address: The Charles Babbage Institute for the History of Information Processing, Suite 224, 701 Welch Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304. This article is adapted, with permission from DPMA, from a paper presented at the Electronic Business Systems Conference, November 8, 1956. Keywords and phrases: SHARE, user group, IBM 701, 702, 704, 705. CR categories: 1.2, 2.2. © 1980 AFIPS 0164- 1239/80/020122-129

SHARE A Eulogy to Cooperative Effort

PAUL ARMER .00/0)

Foreword

M. I. Bernstein Chairman SHARE Pioneer Day, NCC 80

The year 1980 is not only the beginning of a new decade, it is also the twenty-fifth year of what many consider the modern era of data processing. Among the many historically significant events that occurred in 1955 was the creation and founding of SHARE, the first computer user group. In 1956, shortly after the first anniversary of SHARE, Paul Armer delivered the following talk at the Electronic Business Systems Conference in San Francisco, sponsored by the National Machine Accountants Association, which subsequently changed its name to the Data Processing Management Association. Paul says that his principal motive for the talk was to stimulate and encourage the formation of a user group for the IBM 7021705. (In those days the IBM 701 and 704 were considered "scientific" or "engineering" machines, and the 702 and 705 were thought of as "business" or "administrative" machines.) Paul was recruited in this sales effort by Jack A. Strong, the first chairman of SHARE. Jack was responsible for both engineering and administrative computing at North American Aviation in those days and wanted the benefits of a user group for the administrative side of the house -- benefits similar to those he had observed coming from SHARE for the engineering side. The conspiracy was successful in that shortly thereafter GUIDE was organized for the IBM 7021705 users.

In order to appreciate Paul's address properly, one should have some feeling of times and conditions that led to the founding of SHARE. In the limited space available for this introduction, only the briefest of sketches can be provided. Before proceeding, a minor digression is in order. This coming August SHARE will ce...