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IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 2 Number 3 -- Front Matter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129343D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

IEEE Computer Society: OWNER

Abstract

Once again we begin with a memorial to an early pioneer, Herman Lukoff. In a personal reminiscence, Al Tonik recalls Lukoff's long and distinguished career over thirty-five years at Sperry Univac, including work on UNIVAC I, LARC, and several later versions of UNIVAC.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1980 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Annals of the History of Computing Volume 2 Number 3 July 1980 [Front Matter]

Contents About this Issue.....195 Eloge: Herman Lukoff, 1923-1979 - Albert B. Tonik.....196

Articles History of Mechanical Computing Machinery - George C. Chase.....198 Optimization of
Boolean Expressions -- Historical Developments - Jack Minker and Rita G. Minker.....227
Installation of the German Computer Z4 in Zurich in 1950 - Konrad Zuse.....239 The Relay
Calculator Z4 A. P. Speiser.....242 A Short History of Digital Computing in Southern California -
Fred J. Gruenberger.....246 History of Eighteen Symposia - Fred J. Gruenberger.....251 Early
Electronic Computer Developments at IBM - Byron E. Phelps.....253

Departments Comments, Queries, and Debate.....268 Anecdotes.....272 News and
Notices.....273 Corrections.....274 Reviews..... [Material omitted]

About this Issue

Once again we begin with a memorial to an early pioneer, Herman Lukoff. In a personal reminiscence, Al Tonik recalls Lukoff's long and distinguished career over thirty-five years at Sperry Univac, including work on UNIVAC I, LARC, and several later versions of UNIVAC.

Bernard Cohen provides a most interesting introduction and overview to a 1952 report by George C. Chase of the Monroe Calculating Machine Co. Including about 60 photographs of early calculators and the people who invented and developed them, Chase gives us a survey of the machines that led to the modern computers of the 1940s and 1950s. Those of us who first learned computing on machines that work electronically at high speeds will find these forerunners both surprising and interesting.

The paper by Jack Minker and Rita Minker deals with the history of a particular class of algorithms -- namely, the scanning of logical (or Boolean) expressions to produce optimal execution sequences, according to various objective functions. The surprising discovery of their investigation is the almost simultaneous work by several independent people on essentially the same problems, each unaware of the others. In this day of almost overwhelming scientific publication and communication, it is remarkable that so many people were not aware of each other's work.

Of course, during the upheaval of World War II, communication about scientific achievements w...