Browse Prior Art Database

Eloge: Herman Lukoff, 1923-1979

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129344D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

ALBERT B.TONIK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

We can no longer consult one of the pioneers of the computer industry. Herman Lukoff died on September 24, 1979, at the age of 56. He will be missed as an advisor and friend, and as one of the engineers who brought to fruition the visions of such luminaries as John Mauchly and Presper Eckert.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 29% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1980 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Eloge: Herman Lukoff, 1923-1979

ALBERT B.TONIK

(Image Omitted: © 1980 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Keywords and phrases: Lukoff, obituary, UNIVAC LARC, UNIVAC. CR category: 1.2. Author's address: Sperry Univac, P.O. Box 500, Blue Bell, PA 19424. © 1980 AFIPS0164-1239/80/030196-197

Eloge: Herman Lukoff, 1923-1979

ALBERT B.TONIK .00/0)

We can no longer consult one of the pioneers of the computer industry. Herman Lukoff died on September 24, 1979, at the age of 56. He will be missed as an advisor and friend, and as one of the engineers who brought to fruition the visions of such luminaries as John Mauchly and Presper Eckert.

Herman Lukoff began his career on the ENIAC project at the Moore School of the University of Pennsylvania. When Eckert and Mauchly left the school to form the Electronic Control Company, Herman went with them and remained with the company through its name change to the Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation, its purchase by Remington Rand, and the merger into the Sperry Rand Corporation. Herman worked for the same people and the same company -- now the Sperry Univac Division of the Sperry Corporation -- for 35 years; he participated in and witnessed the entire metamorphosis of the company, and he worked long and hard at whatever job he was asked to perform. He always did the best he could, and he asked for the best and got it from the people working under him.

Herman's genius was in reducing things to a practical level. While still a student at the Moore School he built equipment to test the electronics of ENIAC. Later he helped design the circuits for both delay line memories and electrostatic memories -- and showed that in the long run electrostatic memories were unreliable. When work on UNIVAC I began, Herman designed its input/output control (what would now be called the I/O channel and the magnetic tape-control unit). He supervised the manufacture, testing, and installation of the first dozen UNIVAC I's, thus ensuring that the mass production of such complex electronic gear was feasible. Herman was in charge of the design team for the UNIVAC LARC (operational in 1960), which implemented many features of present-day data processing systems, and he headed the Engineering Department from 1960 to 1968, overseeing the design of later systems such as UNIVAC III, UNIVAC 1050, and UNIVAC 9200. H...