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A Short History of Digital Computing in Southern California

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129349D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-05
Document File: 8 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

FRED J. GRUENBERGER: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This is a written report of a talk given January 17, 1958, at the Digital Computer Association, a local informal group. The Southern California area is today generally regarded as a center of activity in high-speed computing, having perhaps the highest density of machines and achieve, prominent people of any area in the world; the rise of this intense activity is Raced from 1942 to 1957.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 13% of the total text.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1980 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

A Short History of Digital Computing in Southern California

FRED J. GRUENBERGER

(Image Omitted: © 1980 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. This article first appeared as Rand Paper P-1599 and was published in Computing News 7, 145 (March 15, 1959). It is reprinted with permission. Author's address: Popular Computing, Box 272, Calabasas, CA 91302. © 1980 AFIPS 0164- 1239/80/030246-250

A Short History of Digital Computing in Southern California

FRED J. GRUENBERGER .00/0)

This is a written report of a talk given January 17, 1958, at the Digital Computer Association, a local informal group. The Southern California area is today generally regarded as a center of activity in high-speed computing, having perhaps the highest density of machines and achieve, prominent people of any area in the world; the rise of this intense activity is Raced from 1942 to 1957.

Keywords and phrases: Southern California company, Digital Computer Association, meetings. CR category: 1.2

The Southern California area is today generally regarded as a center of activity in high-speed computing, having perhaps the highest density of machines and active, prominent people of any area in the world. The development of this intense activity is worth recording, especially in view of the fact that much of the pioneering in the field was done elsewhere.

A few words of definition. The area in question centers around Los Angeles and extends north to the Naval Ordnance Test Station at China Lake and south to San Diego. A third vertex of the triangular area is marked by Point Mugu, where the RAYDAC is located.

Second, it becomes necessary to define computing. The distinction between what was or was not considered computing in the early days rested on two criteria: was it automatic (that is, could the operator walk away from the machine and have the process continue?), and did it involve multiplication and/or division? Thus, application of the Mendenhall-Warren-Hollerith method of progressive digiting for calculating sums of products on a tabulator would count as a computing application; large, complicated punched-card tabulating systems would not. The discussion here concerns only digital equipment.

In preparing this account, there were two sources of information. First, people: people checked in from all sides with anecdotes, claims of having the first of a...