Browse Prior Art Database

History of Eighteen Symposia

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129350D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

FRED J. GRUENBERGER: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Editor's Note: We are publishing the following history of eighteen symposia organized by Fred Gruenberger and Paul Armor to give our readers further insight into the flavor of the early days of computing in Southern California.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 33% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1980 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

History of Eighteen Symposia

FRED J. GRUENBERGER

(Image Omitted: © 1980 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Author's address: Popular Computing, Box 272, Calabasas, CA 91302. This article is reprinted, with permission, from Popular Computing, Number 44, November 1976, pp. 4-7. © 1980 AFIPS 0164-1239/80/030251-252

History of Eighteen Symposia

FRED J. GRUENBERGER .00/0)

Editor's Note: We are publishing the following history of eighteen symposia organized by Fred Gruenberger and Paul Armor to give our readers further insight into the flavor of the early days of computing in Southern California.

Keywords and phrases: symposia, meetings, Southern California computing

CR category: 1.2

In 1958, it was observed that the really interesting part of computing conventions was not the formal talks but the informal discussions in the hotel lobbies and on the exhibit floor. Moreover, the information gathered in the informal discussions was current; the formal talks tended to be a year or more out of date The way to find out what was going on in the computing world was to find the right group and infiltrate it. Thus an idea emerged: why not go at this up-to-date exchange of ideas systematically?

A group of twelve experts was invited to spend a day at the Rand Corporation to discuss current topics in the field. The discussion was taped, and a transcript of the session was produced. In those days we had East and West Joint Computer Conferences. By tacking this symposium onto the week of the Western conference, it was feasible to get nearly anyone we wished to have attend, since they were already committed to traveling to or near Santa Monica.

The affair was repeated year after year, winding up in New York City in 1976 where the last such session was held. It seems reasonable to quit while we're ahead -- to bow out gracefully, before the act gets too stale.

It took us several years to get the mechanics of the affair just right. To be productive, the invited group must be fairly homogeneous; that is, it is necessary that no person dominate the group or feel dominated. Thus, attempts to liven things up by injecting promising youngsters into the groups always failed; the youngsters promptly shut up and failed to contribute. How talkative would you be in the same group with, say, J. Presper Eckert, or Herb Grosch, or Dick Hamming?

IEEE...