Browse Prior Art Database

Eloge: Antonin Svoboda, 1907-1980

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129353D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-05
Document File: 21 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

JAN G. OBLONSKY: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

[Figure containing following caption omitted: Antonin Svoboda in 1970.] When the Fourth IEEE Symposium on Computer Arithmetic assembled in Santa Monica in October 1978, the following note was attached to the foreword of the proceedings: [Figure containing following caption omitted: With the consent of the Program Committee, we wish to dedicate these Proceedings ... to Professor Antonin Svoboda on the occasion of his retirement from active academic life which has spanned a half century of creative activity in Europe and in the United States. Among his varied interests in computer science and computer engineering, Tony's continued contributions to computer arithmetic have inspired many of us by their originality, rigor, and by the infectious enthusiasm of his personal presentations.]

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 6% of the total text.

Page 1 of 21

THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1980 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Eloge: Antonin Svoboda, 1907-1980

JAN G. OBLONSKY

  (Image Omitted: © 1980 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Author's Address: IBM Corporation, Dept. 608, 18100 Frederick Pike, Gaithersburg, MD 20760. Keywords and phrases: Antonin Svoboda, obituary, Czechoslovakian computing, residue arithmetic, pipeline arithmetic, fault-tolerant computing. CR category: 1.2. © 1980 AFIPS 0164-1239/80/040284-298

Eloge: Antonin Svoboda, 1907-1980

JAN G. OBLONSKY .00/0)

(Image Omitted: Antonin Svoboda in 1970.)

When the Fourth IEEE Symposium on Computer Arithmetic assembled in Santa Monica in October 1978, the following note was attached to the foreword of the proceedings:

   (Image Omitted: With the consent of the Program Committee, we wish to dedicate these Proceedings ... to Professor Antonin Svoboda on the occasion of his retirement from active academic life which has spanned a half century of creative activity in Europe and in the United States. Among his varied interests in computer science and computer engineering, Tony's continued contributions to computer arithmetic have inspired many of us by their originality, rigor, and by the infectious enthusiasm of his personal presentations.)

Computer arithmetic was just one of the many fields of interest of Antonin Svoboda, who pioneered the use of analog computers in fire- control devices, who worked on fault tolerance in digital computers, and whose creativity astounded all who had the opportunity to work with him.

Antonin Svoboda was born on October 14, 1907, in Prague, Czechoslovakia, where his father was professor of Czech language and literature. After obtaining his electrical engineering degree in 1931 from the Czech Institute of Technology in Prague (Ceske Vysoke Uceni Technicke), he studied theoretical and experimental physics at Charles University, also in Prague. There he met an astronomy student, Miluna Joanelli, whom he married in 1936. In the same year he submitted a thesis on the application of tensor calculus to electric power distribution and obtained the Doctor of Technical Sciences degree from the Institute of Technology. His early interests were in physics -- extensions of relativity theory and X-ray spectroscopy, which he pursued at the institute of Professor Dolejsek in Prague. As a hobby, he published a book, New Theory of Bridge, which presented a scientific ap...