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Some Important Computers of Japanese Design

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129355D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-05
Document File: 12 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

HIDETOSI TAKAHASI: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Hidetosi Takahasi's interesting chronology of the early work in Japan on computers was presented at the First USA-Japan Computer Conference, held in Tokyo in 1972 under the joint sponsorship of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies (AFIPS) and the Information Processing Society of Japan (IPSJ). That conference (as well as the following two) was organized with the intent of enhancing the mutual flow of information between Japan and the United States, acknowledging at the same time that developments in the United States were better known to the Japanese professional community than was the case in the other direction.1 [Footnote] 1. Richard Tanaka was responsible for initiating all three of the USA-Japan Computer Conferences and served as the honorary cochairman for them from the United States. To help establish some background for the paper, it may be helpful to outline how the events described fit into the chronology of computer development in Japan. To do this, it is convenient to consider events in the Japanese computer industry as separated into three consecutive time phases. (Some readers may not agree with my arbitrary definitions for the transitions or the groupings, but the basic sequence is valid.) The first phase, which is in fact the time period covered in Takahasi's2 [Footnote] 2 The reader may notice, not only in Takahasi's article but also in others from Japan, an apparent discrepancy in the spelling of the syllable pronounced ";she"; and spelled both ";si"; and ";shi."; The latter is the currently common phonetic spelling; the former represents a convention established earlier but modified in the late 1940s or early 1950s. In following the Annals style of not using titles, the honorific ";Professor"; has been omitted from Takahasi's name; it would certainly be used in Japan. paper, encompasses a relatively unstructured time, when individuals, universities, and companies were participating in separate and sporadic development activities.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1980 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Some Important Computers of Japanese Design

HIDETOSI TAKAHASI

  (Image Omitted: © 1980 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Author's address: Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering, Keio University, 832 Hiyoshi-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223, Japan. Note: This article originally appeared in Proceedings of or First USA- Japan Computer Conference, 1972. It is published here, slightly modified, with permission. Proceedings are available from AFIPS for 0 for the first conference and S40 for the second and third. Keywords and phrases: Japanese computers, parametron. CR category: 1.2. ©1980 AFIPS 0164-1239/80/040330-337

Some Important Computers of Japanese Design

HIDETOSI TAKAHASI .00/0)

Foreword

Hidetosi Takahasi's interesting chronology of the early work in Japan on computers was presented at the First USA-Japan Computer Conference, held in Tokyo in 1972 under the joint sponsorship of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies (AFIPS) and the Information Processing Society of Japan (IPSJ). That conference (as well as the following two) was organized with the intent of enhancing the mutual flow of information between Japan and the United States, acknowledging at the same time that developments in the United States were better known to the Japanese professional community than was the case in the other direction.11

To help establish some background for the paper, it may be helpful to outline how the events described fit into the chronology of computer development in Japan. To do this, it is convenient to consider events in the Japanese computer industry as separated into three consecutive time phases. (Some readers may not agree with my arbitrary definitions for the transitions or the groupings, but the basic sequence is valid.)

The first phase, which is in fact the time period covered in Takahasi's22 paper, encompasses a relatively unstructured time, when individuals, universities, and companies were participating in separate and sporadic development activities.

1 1. Richard Tanaka was responsible for initiating all three of the USA-Japan Computer Conferences and served as the honorary cochairman for them from the United States.

2 2 The reader may notice, not only in Takahasi's article but also in others from Japan, an apparent discrepancy in the spelling of the syllable pronounced "she" and spel...