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Eloge: Harold Locke Hazen, 1901 - 1930

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129359D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-05
Document File: 9 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

GORDON S. BROWN: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

[Figure containing following caption omitted: ©; 1981 by the American Federation of Information Processing societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee au or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Author's Address: Room 38 473, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139. Photographs for this article are from the MIT Historical Collections. Keywords: Harold L. Hazen, obituary, Vannevar Bush, servomechanisms, Product Integraph, Differential Analyzer, Network Analyzer. CR Category: 1.2. ©; 1981 AFIPS 0164-1239/81/0104-12$01.00/0]

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1981 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Eloge: Harold Locke Hazen, 1901 - 1930

GORDON S. BROWN

  (Image Omitted: Gordon S. Brown was born in Australia in 1907. He came to MIT in 1929 and received his S.B., S.M., and Sc.D. degrees in electrical engineering. He was a student of Harold Hazen's. Brown established the Servomechanisms Laboratory at MIT in 1941 and, with Donald P. Campbell, wrote Principles of Servomechanisms (Wiley, 1948). He succeeded Haven as head of the Department of Electrical Engineering in 1952 and served as dean of engineering from 1959 to 1968. He retired in 1973 as Institute Professor Emeritus.)

  (Image Omitted: © 1981 by the American Federation of Information Processing societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee au or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Author's Address: Room 38 473, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139. Photographs for this article are from the MIT Historical Collections. Keywords: Harold L. Hazen, obituary, Vannevar Bush, servomechanisms, Product Integraph, Differential Analyzer, Network Analyzer. CR Category: 1.2. © 1981 AFIPS 0164-1239/81/0104-12

Eloge: Harold Locke Hazen, 1901 - 1930

GORDON S. BROWN

  (Image Omitted: Gordon S. Brown was born in Australia in 1907. He came to MIT in 1929 and received his S.B., S.M., and Sc.D. degrees in electrical engineering. He was a student of Harold Hazen's. Brown established the Servomechanisms Laboratory at MIT in 1941 and, with Donald P. Campbell, wrote Principles of Servomechanisms (Wiley, 1948). He succeeded Haven as head of the Department of Electrical Engineering in 1952 and served as dean of engineering from 1959 to 1968. He retired in 1973 as Institute Professor Emeritus.)

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Harold L. Hazen, Dean Emeritus of the Graduate School at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who died in Belmont, Massachusetts, on February 21, 1980, was one of this country's early pioneers in the field of machine computation and automatic control.

Hazen's first contribution to the computer field came as part of his thesis for the S.B. degree in electrical engineering at MIT during the academic years 1923-1924. His thesis supervisor was Vannevar Bush, whose interests in those days included, among other matters, gaining a better understanding of the steady-state and dynamic behavior of large interconnected electric power systems. Even sixty years ago, a typical power system consisted of many transmission lines interconnecting numerous generating stations and load cent...