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The Development of Theoretical Computer Science - Foreword

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129360D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

RONALD V. BOOK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The Technical Committee on Mathematical Foundations of Computing, IEEE Computer Society, held its twentieth annual symposium on October 29- 31, 1979, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The original title of the symposium, ";Switching Circuit Theory and Logical Design,"; reflected the main area of interest in the early 1960s. In the mid- 1960s the emphasis shifted, and its name became ";Switching and Automata Theory."; In the mid-1970s the emphasis and name changed once again, to ";Foundations of Computer Science.";

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Copyright ©; 1981 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

The Development of Theoretical Computer Science - Foreword

RONALD V. BOOK

The Technical Committee on Mathematical Foundations of Computing, IEEE Computer Society, held its twentieth annual symposium on October 29- 31, 1979, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The original title of the symposium, "Switching Circuit Theory and Logical Design," reflected the main area of interest in the early 1960s. In the mid- 1960s the emphasis shifted, and its name became "Switching and Automata Theory." In the mid-1970s the emphasis and name changed once again, to "Foundations of Computer Science."

In order to celebrate this twentieth anniversary, it was decided to add a special feature to the symposium. Three distinguished scientists were invited to present personal histories of their involvement in the development of the foundations of computer science and to provide perspective on some of the themes that emerged in the early days and that have greatly influenced the field. Sheila A. Greibach spoke on "Formal Languages: Origins and Directions," Juris Hartmanis presented "Observations About the Development of Theoretical Computer Science," and Stephen C. Kleene spoke on "Origins of Recursive Function Theory." This special issue presents revised versions of the texts of these three lectures (the papers have been refere...