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IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 3 Number 2 -- Front Matter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129364D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

IEEE Computer Society: OWNER

Abstract

The first article in this issue of the Annals is a very personal account of the reaction of Maurice V. Wilkes to his research into the Babbage notebooks. The notebooks contain extensive diagrams and designs, and Wilkes interprets some of these designs for us. Wilkes's discussion of the control function and its relationship to later implementations is especially interesting. Our second article, by H. R. Schwarz, describes the work of a small but very dedicated group of computer scientists and mathematicians in Switzerland. They installed a Z4 computer in 1950 and later built their own ERMETH computer. On these computers such pioneers as E. Stiefel, A. Speiser, H. Rutishauser, and their colleagues solved a number of complex mathematical and engineering problems, and in the process contributed several important techniques to the field of numerical analysis. We also see the European view of the genesis of ALGOL, in the context of language development already under way on the Continent. The next paper is the third in a series by Martin Campbell-Kelly on early British centers of computer programming. The first two papers dealt with activities at Cambridge (Volume 2, Number 1, January 1980) and Manchester (Volume 2, Number 2, April 1980). This one describes the development of the Pilot ACE at the National Physical Laboratory at Teddington, and we again encounter A. M. Turing, along with J. H. Wilkinson, M. Woodger, and S. Gin. Campbell-Kelly traces a number of NPL programming concepts and techniques, and he compares these efforts with those at other British centers. This view of programming in the early days helps us realize how far we have progressed, with our elaborate operating systems, networks, and time-sharing systems. On the other hand, we learn to appreciate how much those early programmers accomplished with the machines and software tools they had.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1981 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Annals of the History of Computing Volume 3 Number 2 April 1981

Contents About this Issue.....115

Articles The Design of a Control Unit -- Reflections on Reading Babbage's Notebooks - M. V. Wilkes....116 The Early Years of Programming in Switzerland - H. R. Schwarz.....121
Programming the Pilot ACE: Early Programming Activity at the National Physical Laboratory - Martin Campbell-Kelly.....133 Early Computers at 18M - Cuthbert C. Hurd.....163

Departments Meetings in Retrospect.....183 Anecdotes: IBM 701.....186 Comments, Queries,
and Debate.....189 News and Notices.....192 Reviews: A History of Computing in the Twentieth
Century..... [Material omitted]

About this Issue

The first article in this issue of the Annals is a very personal account of the reaction of Maurice
V. Wilkes to his research into the Babbage notebooks. The notebooks contain extensive diagrams and designs, and Wilkes interprets some of these designs for us. Wilkes's discussion of the control function and its relationship to later implementations is especially interesting.

Our second article, by H. R. Schwarz, describes the work of a small but very dedicated group of computer scientists and mathematicians in Switzerland. They installed a Z4 computer in 1950 and later built their own ERMETH computer. On these computers such pioneers as E. Stiefel, A. Speiser, H. Rutishauser, and their colleagues solved a number of complex mathematical and engineering problems, and in the process contributed several important techniques to the field of numerical analysis. We also see the European view of the genesis of ALGOL, in the context of language development already under way on the Continent.

The next paper is the third in a series by Martin Campbell-Kelly on early British centers of computer programming. The first two papers dealt with activities at Cambridge (Volume 2, Number 1, January 1980) and Manchester (Volume 2, Number 2, April 1980). This one describes the development of the Pilot ACE at the National Physical Laboratory at Teddington, and we again encounter A. M. Turing, along with J. H. Wilkinson, M. Woodger, and S. Gin. Campbell-Kelly t...