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IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 3 Number 3 -- Front Matter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129369D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 16K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

IEEE Computer Society: OWNER

Abstract

A great deal has been written about the cryptographic achievements of the Allies during World War II, including the interesting article by I. J. Good published in the Annals (Volume 1, Number 1, July 1979). Most of what has been published has centered on the British success in breaking the German Enigma codes, and while there is usually some reference to the Polish underground, Poland's role has generally been perceived as limited to the acquisition of an Enigma machine for analysis by the British. In this issue of the Annals we present a translation of an article by the late Marian Rejewski, one of the principal Polish cryptanalysts, describing the significant role of the Poles in analyzing the Enigma codes. Rejewski details the laborious manual methods that were used to break such codes before the advent of computer techniques. In order to put the article into perspective, we asked I. J. Good, who was involved with the British activities, and Cipher A. Deavours, who has studied the Enigma, to provide comments. We have already published several articles about Charles Babbage and his work. In particular, Alfred W. Van Sinderen compiled a Babbage bibliography (Annals, Volume 2, Number 2, April 1980). In this issue M. R. Williams describes Babbage's personal library, which reflected the varied interests of an excellent mathematician and scientist in nineteenth century England. Continuing our set of papers on the life and work of Konrad Zuse, we have a major article on the early Zuse computers by Paul E. Ceruzzi. The paper, which resulted from a doctoral dissertation, follows Zuse through the conception and implementation of his early computers and documents the reasons for their various distinctive designs.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1981 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Annals of the History of Computing Volume 3 Number 3 July 1981

Contents About this Issue.....211 An Editorial Statement.....212

Articles How Polish Mathematicians Broke the Enigma Cipher - Marian Rejewski......213 The
Scientific Library of Charles Babbage - M. R. Williams.....235 The Early Computers of Konrad
Zuse, 1935 t 1945 0 Paul E. Ceruzzi.....241 The Principles of Large-Scale Computing Machines
- John von Neumann.....263 The NORC and Problems in High-Speed Computing - John on
Neumann.....274

Departments Meetings in Retrospect.....280 Anecdotes - HOPL Banquet Tapes.....283 News
and Notices.....286 Comments, Queries, and Debate.....288 Reviews A History of Numerical
Analysis An Age of Innovation Banquet Anecdotes, Conference Excerpts [Material omitted]

About this Issue

A great deal has been written about the cryptographic achievements of the Allies during World War II, including the interesting article by I. J. Good published in the Annals (Volume 1, Number 1, July 1979). Most of what has been published has centered on the British success in breaking the German Enigma codes, and while there is usually some reference to the Polish underground, Poland's role has generally been perceived as limited to the acquisition of an Enigma machine for analysis by the British. In this issue of the Annals we present a translation of an article by the late Marian Rejewski, one of the principal Polish cryptanalysts, describing the significant role of the Poles in analyzing the Enigma codes. Rejewski details the laborious manual methods that were used to break such codes before the advent of computer techniques. In order to put the article into perspective, we asked I. J. Good, who was involved with the British activities, and Cipher A. Deavours, who has studied the Enigma, to provide comments.

We have already published several articles about Charles Babbage and his work. In particular, Alfred W. Van Sinderen compiled a Babbage bibliography (Annals, Volume 2, Number 2, April 1980). In this issue M. R. Williams describes Babbage's personal library, which reflected the varied interests of an excellent mathematician and scientist in nineteenth century England.

Continuing our set of papers on the life and work of Konrad Zuse, we have a major article on the early Zuse computers by Paul E. Ceruzzi. The paper, which resulted from a doctoral dissertation, follows Zuse through the conception and implementation of his early computers and documents the reasons for their various distinctive designs.

There are many references in the literature to the ideas and contributions of John vo...