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The Principles of Large-Scale Computing Machines

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129373D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-05
Document File: 14 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

JOHN VON NEUMANN: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The following paper, ";Principles of Large-Scale Computing Machines,"; was one of many seminal works on computing prepared by John von Neumann. This specific paper formed the basis for an article that appears in von Neumann's Collected Works (Vol. V), edited by A. H. Taub and published in 1963 by Pergamon Press. Coauthored by Herman H. Goldstine and von Neumann, the article in the volume is a much expanded version of the following paper. At the time he delivered the paper on May 15, 1946, von Neumann was one of the United States' foremost mathematicians and government science advisors. Prior to World War II his career spanned numerous fields of pure mathematics and mathematical physics, including formal logic, algebra, analysis, and geometry, as well as quantum mechanics. During the war years von Neumann devoted most of his enormous energies and genius to war-related activities, including the development of the atomic bomb. This work convinced him of the overwhelming need for high-speed computational devices for solving a wide variety of problems in applied mathematics.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1981 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

The Principles of Large-Scale Computing Machines

JOHN VON NEUMANN

(Image Omitted: © 1981 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright. notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Keywords: electronic computing, stored-program concept, numerical methods. CR Categories: 1.2, 2.1, 5.1, 6.21. © 1981 AFIPS 0164- 1239/81/030263-273

The Principles of Large-Scale Computing Machines

JOHN VON NEUMANN .00/00)

Foreword

The following paper, "Principles of Large-Scale Computing Machines," was one of many seminal works on computing prepared by John von Neumann. This specific paper formed the basis for an article that appears in von Neumann's Collected Works (Vol. V), edited by A. H. Taub and published in 1963 by Pergamon Press. Coauthored by Herman H. Goldstine and von Neumann, the article in the volume is a much expanded version of the following paper.

At the time he delivered the paper on May 15, 1946, von Neumann was one of the United States' foremost mathematicians and government science advisors. Prior to World War II his career spanned numerous fields of pure mathematics and mathematical physics, including formal logic, algebra, analysis, and geometry, as well as quantum mechanics. During the war years von Neumann devoted most of his enormous energies and genius to war-related activities, including the development of the atomic bomb. This work convinced him of the overwhelming need for high-speed computational devices for solving a wide variety of problems in applied mathematics.

In August 1944, quite by accident, von Neumann learned about the ENIAC project at the Moore School of Electrical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. He worked with the Moore School staff on the ENIAC and the subsequent electronic digital computer called the EDVAC, developed under the direction of John W. Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert, Jr In June 1945 von Neumann prepared a document called "First Draft of a Report on the EDVAC," which contained, for the first time, the basic ideas intrinsic to the stored-program concept.

After the war was over, most mathematicians who had worked on war- related applied mathematics activities returned to their theoretical pursuits in pure mathematics; not von Neumann. He set out to build an electronic digital computer at the Institute for Advanced Study, a highly theoretical organization that heretofore had never even considered funding applied research or...