Browse Prior Art Database

Eloge: Jule G. Charney, 1917-1981

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129376D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

NORMAN A. PHILLIPS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

[Figure containing following caption omitted: ©; 1981 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Author's Address: National Weather Service, Washington, DC 20233. ©; 1981 AFIPS 0164-1239/81 /040308-309$01.00/00] Jule Gregory Chamey, Alfred P. Sloan Professor of Meteorology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, died June 16, 1981, at the Sidney Farber Cancer Institute. He was the leading world figure in meteorology ever since he and John von Neumann first introduced the electronic computer into weather prediction in 1950.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1981 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Eloge: Jule G. Charney, 1917-1981

NORMAN A. PHILLIPS

(Image Omitted: Norman A. Phillips was a colleague of Jule G. Charney from 1951 to 1974. He is now principal scientist of the National Weather Service in Washington.)

(Image Omitted: © 1981 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Author's Address: National Weather Service, Washington, DC 20233. © 1981 AFIPS 0164-1239/81 /040308-309

Eloge: Jule G. Charney, 1917-1981

NORMAN A. PHILLIPS

(Image Omitted: Norman A. Phillips was a colleague of Jule G. Charney from 1951 to 1974. He is now principal scientist of the National Weather Service in Washington.)

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Jule Gregory Chamey, Alfred P. Sloan Professor of Meteorology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, died June 16, 1981, at the Sidney Farber Cancer Institute. He was the leading world figure in meteorology ever since he and John von Neumann first introduced the electronic computer into weather prediction in 1950.

Chamey was born on January 1, 1917, in California, to Russian immigrants. His original graduate studies at UCLA were in mathematics, but he changed to meteorology in about 1942. The basic principle of numerical weather forecasting is to express the physical laws of atmospheric hydrodynamics and thermodynamics in numerical algorithms that can be numerically solved by the computer as a step-wise marching process in time. AB a concept this was not new in 1950 -- it had been outlined in some detail 30 years earlier by the Englishman Lewis F. Richardson (1922). Richardson's test calculation -- done "by hand," under difficult front- line conditions in World War I -- gave very erroneous results, however.11

AS early as May 1946, von Neumann had envisaged meteorology as a major component of his newly formed Electronic Computer Project at the Institute for Advanced Study (Goldstine 1972; Platzman 1979). Chamey's 1946 doctoral thesis had suggested to Charney that the large-scale circulations in the atmosphere could only be analyzed in a physically appealing and

1 1. See the introduction by S. Chapman to the 1965 Dover reprint of Richardson's book. The usual interpretation that Richardson failed because he did not know of the yet-to-be formulated Courant-Friedericha-Lemy numerical stability condition is beside the mark, since Richardson computed only one time step. The basic problem encountered by Richardson w...