Browse Prior Art Database

Radar Data Transmission

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129423D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 7 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

JOHN V. HARRINGTON: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The paper reviews the development of radar data transmission and its role in the SAGE system. The work leading to the design of the FST-1 and FST-2 radar data-compression systems is described.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 14% of the total text.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1983 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Radar Data Transmission

JOHN V. HARRINGTON

(Image Omitted: © 1983 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Author's Address: Communications Satellite Corporation, 950 L'Enfant Plaza, Washington, DC 20024. Illustrations courtesy MITRE Corporation. © 1983 AFIPS 0164-1239/83/040370-374

Radar Data Transmission

JOHN V. HARRINGTON .00/00)

The paper reviews the development of radar data transmission and its role in the SAGE system. The work leading to the design of the FST-1 and FST-2 radar data-compression systems is described.

Categories and Subject Descriptors: K.2 [History of Computing] -- hardware, SAGE, software, systems General Terms: Design, Management Additional Key Words and Phrases: radar, U.S. Air Force, FST-1, FST-2

Editor's Note

Just as important to the concept of SAGE as the digital computer was the technology for transmitting radar data over telephone lines. Fortunately, while MIT was developing a digital computer for control applications, a group under Jack Harrington at the Air Force Cambridge Research Center was developing techniques for digital signal processing and digital transmission over telephone lines. George Valley seized on these two pioneering efforts and saw that they made a centralized computer-based air-defense system possible.

We had many troubles with radar data transmission, most of which could not be foreseen without trying the equipment out in the real world. Sending digits over telephone lines sounds easy, and it is, but sending them reliably was not. The telephone system had been elegantly designed for sending analog voice, but suffered a number of distortions and noise interferences that only digits could notice -- and notice them they did.

At first the telephone company was dubious about what we were doing. When the first telephone line for radar data came into the Whirlwind building to be wired into one of Jack's modems, the telephone installer insisted on wiring it into a handset. We told him we didn't want the handset, but he said it was regulations and that was that. When he left, we connected it to the modem. I don't know what happened to the handset. Later the telephone company became interested in digital transmission and designed and built the modems for SAGE.

IEEE Computer Society, Oct 01, 1983 Page 1 IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 5 Number 4, Pages 370-374...