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The Genesis of an Early Stored-Program Computer: CSIRAC

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129445D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 10 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

M. BEARD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

One of the earliest vacuum-tube stored-program computers (CS/RAC) was developed in 1947-1951 under the auspices of the Australian Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The word length was 20 bits, and storage consisted of about 1000 words in mercury delay lines and about 4000 words on a magnetic disk. Its execution rate approached 1000 instructions per second.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1984 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

The Genesis of an Early Stored-Program Computer: CSIRAC

M. BEARD

T. PEARCEY

(Image Omitted: © 1984 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or pan of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Authors' Addresses: M. Beard, 27 Lucretia Avenue, Longueville, NSW, 2066 Australia. T. Pearcey, Chisholm Institute of Technology, 900 Dandenong Road, Caulfield East, Vic. 3145, Australia. ©1984 AFIPS 01 64-1 239/84/020106-

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The Genesis of an Early Stored-Program Computer: CSIRAC

M. BEARD

T. PEARCEY .00/00)

One of the earliest vacuum-tube stored-program computers (CS/RAC) was developed in 1947- 1951 under the auspices of the Australian Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The word length was 20 bits, and storage consisted of about 1000 words in mercury delay lines and about 4000 words on a magnetic disk. Its execution rate approached 1000 instructions per second.

The computer was notable for its logical design, which made programming easy and led to economic use of the limited storage. A multiplier was incorporated, and various single-word and single-bit registers were used to assist in relative addressing, subroutine linking, reentrant programming, and decision making. Input was from paper tape and output to paper tape and a modified teletypewriter.

Categories and Subject Descriptors: K.2 [History of Computing] -- CS/RAC, hardware, people, systems General Terms: Design, Performance Additional Key Words and Phrases: Australian Council for Scientific and Industrial Research

The CSIRAC was one of the earliest stored-program computers. Originally known as the Mark I, it was developed under the auspices of the Australian Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) at its Division of Radiophysics in Sydney. (There never were later versions or Marks. Perhaps that name expressed the team's hopes for the future.) The basic ideas incorporated within the CSIRAC were generated locally during 1946 and 1947, independent of the mainstream research projects in the United Kingdom and the United States, such as the Pilot ACE, EDSAC, Manchester Mark I, BINAC, and EDVAC, all some 10,000 miles away.

During World War II both of the originators of the project had experience in the development of radar.

IEEE Computer Society, Apr 01, 1984 Page 1 IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 6 Number 2, Pages 113-115

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The Genesis of an Early Stored-Program Computer:...