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IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 6 Number 4 -- Front Matter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129453D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 16K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

IEEE Computer Society: OWNER

Abstract

In this issue we remember two men who made a lasting impression on those who knew them. Niels Ivar Bech, an outstanding teacher, manager, and communicator, helped create a computer industry in Denmark. He established an environment in which others could study and flourish. I am sure his colleagues in Denmark and in IFIP will remember his influence and his leadership. Before World War II the ";Polish school"; was one of the principal centers for the study of mathematical logic. Alfred Tarski, a leading logician there, emigrated to the United States during the war. The eloge we present here for Tarski was originally written for the alumni of the University of California, Berkeley, where Tarski was well known and loved. On several occasions we have published articles on the history of the theoretical side of computer science. There we can learn about the work of theoreticians -- how they interact with each other and with the practitioners of computing. J. Barkley Rosser's story of the lambda-calculus -- the logical expression of mathematical functions -- and of the part that some of the key logicians and key computer scientists played in its development, is a fine example of keen minds sharpening their ideas against each other, and of a theory that evolved through a series of insights, some even occurring at a theater!

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1984 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Annals of the History of Computing Volume 6 Number 4 October 1984 [Front Matter]

Contents About this Issue.....331

Articles Eloge: Niels Ivar Bech, 1920-1975 - Isaac L. Auerbach.....332 Eloge: Alfred Tarski,
1901-1983 - J. W. Addison.....335 Highlights of the History of the Lambda-Calculus J. - Barkley
Rosser.....337 From ACE to the G-15 - Harry D. Huskey.....350 Automation, 1955: A
Retrospective - Gordon S. Brown and Norbert Wiener.....372 A Survey of Russian Approaches
to Perebor (Brute-Force Search) Algorithms - B. A. Trakhtenbrot.....384

Departments Self-Study Questions.....401 Comments, Queries, and Debate.....402 FORTRAN
Implementations - Donald E. Knuth Edouard Lucas Vindicated - M. R. Williams The Madrid Promptuary - Erwin Tomash Photo Essays

News and Notices.....408 Anecdotes.....409 Whence the "Bug"?

Reviews.....410 R. Moreau, The Computer Comes of Age - Gordon Bell A. Ralston and E. D.
Reilly, Jr., Encyclopedia of Computer Science and Engineering - K. W. Smillie Joel Shurkin, Engines of the Mind - Nancy Stern Capsule Reviews [Material omitted]

About this Issue

In this issue we remember two men who made a lasting impression on those who knew them. Niels Ivar Bech, an outstanding teacher, manager, and communicator, helped create a computer industry in Denmark. He established an environment in which others could study and flourish. I am sure his colleagues in Denmark and in IFIP will remember his influence and his leadership.

Before World War II the "Polish school" was one of the principal centers for the study of mathematical logic. Alfred Tarski, a leading logician there, emigrated to the United States during the war. The eloge we present here for Tarski was originally written for the alumni of the University of California, Berkeley, where Tarski was well known and loved.

On several occasions we have published articles on the history of the theoretical side of computer science. There we can learn about the work of theoreticians -- how they interact with each other and with the practitioners of computing. J. Barkley Rosser's story of the lambda- calculus -- the logical expression of mathematical functions -- and of the part that some of the key logicians and key computer scientists played in its development, is a fine example of keen minds sharpening their ideas against each other, and of a theory that evolved through a series of insights, some even occurring at a theater!

In previous issues of the Annals we have had several papers on the major contributors to the development of computing in England. Now we obs...