Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

From ACE to the G-15

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129457D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

HARRY D. HUSKEY: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The 1946 Turing proposal for a stored-program computer at Britain's National Physical Laboratory is briefly described. The author's participation in the Test Assembly design, NPL's design of the ACE Pilot Model, and the subsequent design of the ACE are presented. The author's return to the United States and his efforts to build a similar computer at the National Bureau of Standards are described. Finally, the design of the Bendix G-15 and how it is related to the other computers is discussed. These computers were characterized by having recirculating memories and logical designs that permitted the execution of several instructions per memory cycle.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 5% of the total text.

Page 1 of 28

THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1984 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

From ACE to the G-15

HARRY D. HUSKEY

(Image Omitted: © 1984 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Author's address: Department of Computer and Information Science, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064. © 1984 AFIPS 0164- 1239/84/040350-371

From ACE to the G-15

HARRY D. HUSKEY .00/00)

The 1946 Turing proposal for a stored-program computer at Britain's National Physical Laboratory is briefly described. The author's participation in the Test Assembly design, NPL's design of the ACE Pilot Model, and the subsequent design of the ACE are presented. The author's return to the United States and his efforts to build a similar computer at the National Bureau of Standards are described. Finally, the design of the Bendix G-15 and how it is related to the other computers is discussed. These computers were characterized by having recirculating memories and logical designs that permitted the execution of several instructions per memory cycle.

Categories and Subject Descriptors: A.0 [General] -- autobiographies, H. D. Kluskey; K.2 [History of Computing] -- ACE, G-15, hardware, people, software General Terms: Design Additional Key Words and Phrases: A. M. Turing, National Bureau of Standards, Bendix

In 1946 people were considering two means of storing information for use in automatic computers. One was by passing acoustic waves down a column. The other was by storing spots of charge on the inside of a cathode-ray tube. At that time neither process had been demonstrated to work. The University of Pennsylvania was developing the acoustic line using a 5-foot column of mercury and pulse rates of a megacyle -- thus a mercury line would store thirty- two 32binary bit numbers. F. C. Williams in England was developing the cathode-ray tube; he planned to store lines of bits on the tube and to access such lines in any (random) order. A delay-line computer was to operate in a strictly serial bit-by-bit way, and it might be necessary to wait for a particular number to emerge from a line before processing could continue. This delay was not present in the cathode-ray-tube system.

This paper is the story of a sequence of computer designs that used the long serial lines with an organization designed to minimize the delay mentioned above. The first of these designs was by Alan Turing.

1. 1946

IEEE Computer Society, Oct 01, 1984 Page 1...