Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 7 Number 2 -- Front Matter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129465D
Original Publication Date: 1985-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 16K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

IEEE Computer Society: OWNER

Abstract

The articles in this issue of the Annals all concern the period around 1947, when the first computers were just coming on-line. It was clear that these computers brought tremendous computational power, but it was not quite as clear what classes of problems could be solved with that power. A few farsighted people anticipated commercial exploitation of computers, others saw innovative approaches to the study of the human brain, and still others envisioned creative ways to solve traditional mathematical problems of overwhelming complexity. John von Neumann was mentioned in almost every discussion among scientists during that period. He seemed to be equally at home in the worlds of theoretical computer science, engineering design, and government policy and funding. Inevitably, he is a major figure throughout this issue. The first article is the unedited transcript of a 1947 meeting that included the developers of the ENIAC, representatives of the University of Pennsylvania and the Institute for Advanced Study, and government officials. Some of those present: von Neumann, Herman Goldstine, John Mauchly, and Presper Eckert. They met to try to straighten out the claims various people had on the potential patents that might be derived from the Moore School computers. Underlying the discussion was the possibility, if not the probability, that the report von Neumann had issued the year before precluded any such patents. If patents could be issued, who was entitled to the benefits that might flow from them? An introduction by Nancy Stern puts the dispute into perspective.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1985 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Annals of the History of Computing Volume 7 Number 2 April 1985 [Front Matter]

Contents About this Issue.....99

Articles Minutes of 1947 Patent Conference, Moore School of Electrical Engineering, University of Pennsylvania - Introduction by Nancy Stern.....100 A verbatim discussion of EDVAC priority
issues by the original claimants

The Scientific Conceptualization of Information: A Survey William F. Aspray.....117 The path of a
new discipline as it emerged from diverse research areas

A Note on Early Monte Carlo Computations and Scientific Meetings Cuthbert C. Hurd.....141
How the method was formulated as mathematicians encountered computers

The Federal Computing Machine Program Mina Rees.....156 A 1950 account of the state of
computing with speculation on the future

Departments Anecdotes.....164 Jonathan Swift's Computing Invention - Eric A. Weiss A 1726
machine to write books automatically

Self-Study Questions.....166

Comments, Queries, and Debate.....167

The Number 2-B Regrettor - Eric A. Weiss Engineering parody of a machine with human capabilities

Meetings in Retrospect.....179 Pioneer Day 1984: Lawrence Livermore Laboratory M. R.
Williams Computing with the biggest and the best

Twentieth Anniversary of DODCI Department of Defense Computer Institute celebrates

News and Notices.....184

Reviews.....185 F. L. Bauer, Ralph Erskine, Jay W. Forrester, K. W. Smillie, Henry S. Tropp,
and M. R. Williams review journals and books [Material omitted]

About this Issue

The articles in this issue of the Annals all concern the period around 1947, when the first computers were just coming on-line. It was clear that these computers brought tremendous computational power, but it was not quite as clear what classes of problems could be solved with that power. A few farsighted people anticipated commercial exploitation of computers, others saw innovative approaches to the study of the human brain, and still others envisioned creative ways to solve traditional mathematical problems of overwhelming complexity.

IEEE Computer Society, Apr 01, 1985 Page 1 IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 7 Number 2, Pages 2_before_99-99

Page 2 of 2

IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 7 Number 2 -- Front Matter

John von Neumann was mentioned in almost every discussion among scientists during that period. He seemed to be equally at home in the worlds of theoretical computer science, engineering design, and government policy and funding. Inevitably, he is a major figure throughout this issue.

The first article is the unedited transcript of a 1947 meeting that included the developers of the ENIAC, representatives of the University of Pennsylvania and the Institute for Advanced Study, and government officials. Some of those present: von Neumann, Herman Goldstine, John Mauchly, and Presp...