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IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 7 Number 3 -- Front Matter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129470D
Original Publication Date: 1985-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 16K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

IEEE Computer Society: OWNER

Abstract

In the October 1983 issue of the Annals, we covered the history of SAGE, the U.S. early-warning air-defense system, and Whirlwind, the computer used in SAGE'S early stages. Many authors referred to George Valley and his role in getting the SAGE project started, but his story was not available to us at that time. In this issue we have Valley's version of how it all happened, told in his own personal and essentially unfettered way. We learn about the formation of the ";Valley Committee,"; the role that committee played, the competing projects, and how the MIT/IBM combination succeeded in getting support from the military for its point of view and methodology. We also see how the Valley team's system of management proved to be so important in carrying the project through. Valley's freewheeling style and attitudes show through vividly here; they help to explain the success of the SAGE system.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1985 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Annals of the History of Computing Volume 7 Number 3 July 1985 [Front Matter]

Contents About this Issue.....195

Articles How the SAGE Development Began - George E. Valley, Jr.....196 An insider's personal
view of the creation of the Semi-Automatic Ground Environment

Helmut Hoeizer's Fully Electronic Analog Computer - James E. Tomayko.....227 Conceived in
1935, this general-purpose device was built in Germany in 1941

A Course in the History of Computation - M. R. Williams.....241 Teaching college students about
the evolution of calculating machines

Departments Biographies.....245 Data Processing Digest: Thirty Years Before the Masthead -
Margaret Milligan An autobiographical account by the editor of the second oldest computer publication

Comments, Queries, and Debate.....251 More Comment on Review of IBM Journal - John E.
Griffith Still More About IBM - Herbert R. J. Grosch

Editor's Note - Werner Buchholz

News and Notices.....253

Self-Study Questions.....255

Anecdotes.....256

I/O in the IBM 709 Computer - Bernard A. Galler A 1940 Word Processor - P. M. Murphy

Reviews.....258 The Computer Museum - Eric A. Weiss J. Bernstein, Three Degrees Above
Zero - Eric A. Weiss D. R. Hartree, Calculating Machines - Henry S. Tropp W. Kozaczuk, Enigma - Ralph Erskine S. Levy, Hackers - John A. N. Lee A. Osborne and J. Dvorak, Hypergrowth - Gwen Bell E. W. Pugh, Memories that Shaped an Industry - M. R. Williams

Capsule Reviews [Material omitted]

About this Issue

In the October 1983 issue of the Annals, we covered the history of SAGE, the U.S. early- warning air-defense system, and Whirlwind, the computer used in SAGE'S early stages. Many authors referred to George Valley and his role in getting the SAGE project started, but his story was not available to us at that time. In this issue we have Valley's version of how it all happened, told in his own personal and essentially unfettered way. We learn about the formation of the "Valley Committee," the role that committee played, the competing projects, and how the MIT/IBM combination succeeded in getting support from the military for its point of view and methodology. We also see how the Valley team's system of management proved to be

IEEE Computer Society, Jul 01, 1985 Page 1 IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 7 Number 3, Pages 2_before_195-195

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IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 7 Number 3 -- Front Matter

so important in carrying the project through. Valley's freewheeling style and attitudes show through vividly here; they help to explain the success of the SAGE system.

We know very little about computer-related events that occurred in Germany during World War II, with the exception of the work of Konrad Zuse. Now James Tomayko tells the hist...