Browse Prior Art Database

Helmut Hoeizer's Fully Electronic Analog Computer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129472D
Original Publication Date: 1985-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 11 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

JAMES E. TOMAYKO: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A fully electronic general-purpose analog computer was designed by Helmut Hoeizer, a German electrical engineer and remote-controlled guidance specialist. He and an assistant built the device in 1941 in Peenemunde, Germany, where they were working as part of Wernher von Braun's long-range rocket development team. The computer was based on an electronic integrator and differentiator conceived by Hoeizer in 1935 and first applied to the guidance system of the A-4 rocket. This computer is significant in the history not only of analog computation but also of the formulation of simulation techniques. It contributed to a system for rocket development that resulted in vehicles capable of reaching the moon.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1985 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Helmut Hoeizer's Fully Electronic Analog Computer

JAMES E. TOMAYKO

(Image Omitted: © 1985 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Author's Address: Department of Computer Science, Campus Box 83, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS 67208. © 1985 AFIPS 0164-

1239/85/030227-240

Helmut Hoeizer's Fully Electronic Analog Computer

JAMES E. TOMAYKO .00/00)

A fully electronic general-purpose analog computer was designed by Helmut Hoeizer, a German electrical engineer and remote-controlled guidance specialist. He and an assistant built the device in 1941 in Peenemunde, Germany, where they were working as part of Wernher von Braun's long-range rocket development team. The computer was based on an electronic integrator and differentiator conceived by Hoeizer in 1935 and first applied to the guidance system of the A-4 rocket. This computer is significant in the history not only of analog computation but also of the formulation of simulation techniques. It contributed to a system for rocket development that resulted in vehicles capable of reaching the moon.

Categories and Subject Descriptors: C. 1.m [Processor Architectures]: Miscellaneous -- analog computers; 1.6.3 [Simulation and Modeling]: Applications; K. ' [History of Computing] -- hardware, people General Terms: Design Additional Key Words and Phrases: V-2 rocket, W. von Braun, guidance and control

A fully electronic general-purpose analog computer was designed by Helmut Hoelzer, a German electrical engineer and remote-controlled guidance specialist. He and an assistant built the device in 1941 in Peenemunde, Germany, where they were working as part of Wernher von Braun's long-range rocket development team. The computer was used in a variety of simulations and trajectory calculations at Peenemunde and later at Fort Bliss, Texas, when the rocket team and some of its equipment migrated to the United States. This computer is significant not only in the history of analog computation, but as the centerpiece of the growth of the art and science of simulation. It contributed to a system for rocket development that resulted in vehicles capable of reaching the moon. Despite its utility and impact, this machine has received little notice in existing histories of analog computation.

History of Analog Computers

Analog computers calculate by modeling the real world. Whereas digital...