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Biographies Data Processing Digest: Thirty Years Before the Masthead

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129474D
Original Publication Date: 1985-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 6 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

MARGARET MILLIGAN: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The second-oldest, still-living computer publication celebrated its 30th birthday in April 1985. It's not the one you are thinking of -- unless you are one of the small cadre of faithful subscribers who read Data Processing Digest (DPD) every month.l [Footnote] 1 The oldest computer publication still being published is Edmund C. Berkeley's Computers and People (Computers and Automation in the early days), older than PDP by three years. The second oldest member of the set, then, was Computing News, started by Fred Gruenberger in 1954. In 1957 he gave it to Jackson Cranholm, who continued it until 1959. Here is my autobiographical account of DPD's history.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1985 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Biographies Data Processing Digest: Thirty Years Before the Masthead

MARGARET MILLIGAN

ERIC A. WEISS

EDITOR

  (Image Omitted: © 1985 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Author's Address: Data Processing Digest, 2522 Bombadil Lane Davis, CA 95616. Categories and Subject Descriptors: A.0 [General] -- autobiographies; K.2 [History of Computing] -- people. General Terms: Human Factors. Additional Key Words and Phrases: Data Processing Digest, publication. © 01985 AFIPS 0164- 1239/85/030245-250

Biographies Data Processing Digest: Thirty Years Before the Masthead

MARGARET MILLIGAN

ERIC A. WEISS

EDITOR.00/00)

Introduction

The second-oldest, still-living computer publication celebrated its 30th birthday in April 1985. It's not the one you are thinking of -- unless you are one of the small cadre of faithful subscribers who read Data Processing Digest (DPD) every month.l1 Here is my autobiographical account of DPD's history.

The Beginning

In the fall of 1954, Richard G. Canning and Roger L. Sisson formed a consulting partnership to help businesspersons adapt their business operations to the computer. (It wasn't the other way around for a long time!) Canning was writing a definitive book, Electronic Data Processing for Business and Industry, and had gained a reputation for innovative thinking in the new uses of

1 1 The oldest computer publication still being published is Edmund C. Berkeley's Computers and People (Computers and Automation in the early days), older than PDP by three years. The second oldest member of the set, then, was Computing News, started by Fred Gruenberger in 1954. In 1957 he gave it to Jackson Cranholm, who continued it until 1959.

IEEE Computer Society, Jul 01, 1985 Page 1 IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 7 Number 3, Pages 245-250

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Biographies Data Processing Digest: Thirty Years Before the Masthead

computers. As he and Sisson began searching through what had been, and was being, published in the new field, they found it a time-consuming and frustrating chore. They knew others were having the same problem, and they decided to provide some kind of ongoing periodical searching and abstracting service for their clients. They were planning a Reader's Digest of computation. The problem was to find someone to do the searching, reading, and writing -- who turned out to be me.

Since...