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Universities: Editor's Note

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129482D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

IEEE Computer Society: OWNER

Abstract

The IBM Type 650 was the first computer to be used extensively in universities. Several prominent computer scientists have written papers for this section to show not only how the 650 was used in the universities but also how much respect and even affection they felt for the machine, for its capabilities, and for what nearly all of them call its ";robustness."; Here also are discussions of what we call ";programming aids"; in the next section.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1986 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Universities: Editor's Note

The IBM Type 650 was the first computer to be used extensively in universities. Several prominent computer scientists have written papers for this section to show not only how the 650 was used in the universities but also how much respect and even affection they felt for the machine, for its capabilities, and for what nearly all of them call its "robustness." Here also are discussions of what we call "programming aids" in the next section.

Bernie Galler introduces the section with a history of computers in institutions of higher education. He prepared the tables printed below and referred to in his article. They give some important statistics on the 650 and other computers of its era.

Three papers describe the work at the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie-Mellon University). Lee Bach was the dean of the Graduate School of Industrial Administration there, and Alan Perlis was hired as the first director of the computation center. Herbert Simon and Allen Newell soon came from the Rand Corporation. Their combined stories of the 650, and methods of programming it, provide a comprehensive view of the world of university computing of 30 years ago. Three more authors describe their experiences with the 650 at other universities: Don Knuth at Case Institute of Technology, Bruce Arden at the University...