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A Computer for Carnegie

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129484D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 4 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

G. L. BACH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Carnegie Institute of Technology was the first university I know of that installed an IBM 650 in a department other than mathematics or engineering. Lee Bach, a distinguished economist, invited me to speak at a ";School for Executives"; on March 21, 1954. I probably spoke of the 650 and the Educational Grant Plan. I distinctly remember the excitement and interest in computing on the part of the faculty members who attended. The Graduate School of Industrial Administration (GSIA) at Carnegie Institute of Technology (CIT), later Carnegie-Mellon University, as far as I know was the first business school in the world to install a modern digital computer for research and teaching purposes. Work on computer languages and on computer use in solving complex problems soon pulled together a group of business-school and engineering- science-oriented faculty and students. Arrival of that first computer (an IBM 650) in the GSIA basement in 1956 was an important early step toward development of computer science and the information revolution of the past quarter century. How did it happen that such first, successful steps toward a phenomenal new area of human knowledge should occur in, of all places, a new, tiny business school? The answer, from the point of view of the professionals who made up the burgeoning new field, is given in more detail and with more authority than I can manage by Alan Perlis, Herbert Simon, and Allen Newell in this volume. I can offer only a few notes and anecdotes.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 25% of the total text.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1986 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

A Computer for Carnegie

G. L. BACH

(Image Omitted: © 1986 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or pan of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Author's Address: Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305. Categories and Subject Descriptors: C.1.1 [Processor Architectures], Single Data Stream Architectures; K.2 [History of Computing] -- hardware, IBM 650, people, software. General Term: Design. Additional Key Words awl Phrases: education. © 1986 AFIPS 0164-1239/86/O1OO39-041

A Computer for Carnegie

G. L. BACH .00/00)

Editor's Note

Carnegie Institute of Technology was the first university I know of that installed an IBM 650 in a department other than mathematics or engineering. Lee Bach, a distinguished economist, invited me to speak at a "School for Executives" on March 21, 1954. I probably spoke of the 650 and the Educational Grant Plan. I distinctly remember the excitement and interest in computing on the part of the faculty members who attended.

The Graduate School of Industrial Administration (GSIA) at Carnegie Institute of Technology (CIT), later Carnegie-Mellon University, as far as I know was the first business school in the world to install a modern digital computer for research and teaching purposes. Work on computer languages and on computer use in solving complex problems soon pulled together a group of business-school and engineering- science-oriented faculty and students. Arrival of that first computer (an IBM 650) in the GSIA basement in 1956 was an important early step toward development of computer science and the information revolution of the past quarter century. How did it happen that such first, successful steps toward a phenomenal new area of human knowledge should occur in, of all places, a new, tiny business school?

The answer, from the point of view of the professionals who made up the burgeoning new field, is given in more detail and with more authority than I can manage by Alan Perlis, Herbert Simon, and Allen Newell in this volume. I can offer only a few notes and anecdotes.

My role, as the dean of the newly founded, "new look" business school, was mainly to build a high-quality graduate school for future managers in a complex, highly technical business world. This, we thought, called for a radically fresh look at business administration.

IEEE Computer Society, Jan 01, 1986 Page 1 IEEE Annals of the History...