Browse Prior Art Database

Educational Experience with the IBM 650

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129489D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 3 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

JOHN G. HERRIOT: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Herriot traces the history of computing at Stanford University, beginning with the IBM CPC and extending through the life of the 650 there. Included are the names of many of the participants, among them George Forsythe, who is shown in a photograph standing next to a 650 with Herriot and Jeanetta Riding, a student. When IBM was contemplating the introduction of the Educational Grant Plan for the 650 and other computers, I wanted to make a market survey. When I visited Stanford, I spoke with, among others, its president, Wallace Sterling; the provost, Frederick E. Terman; and professors Albert H. Bowker and John Herriot. One might say that Stanford University fully entered the computer age when an IBM 650 computer was installed in January 1956. Even before this, the Stanford Computation Center had been established in March 1953. Following an agreement between Frederick E. Terman, dean of the School of Engineering, and Albert H. Bowker, professor of statistics and mathematics and director of the Applied Mathematics and Statistics Laboratory, funding of the Computation Center was guaranteed jointly by the Electronics Research Laboratories and the Applied Mathematics and Statistics Laboratory. The center was directed by Allen M. Peterson, an assistant professor of electrical engineering, and me, then an associate professor of mathematics. At that time an IBM Card- Programmed Calculator (CPC) was installed. Much useful computing for the solution of problems in engineering, physics, and other scientific fields was done on the CPC. Two graduate students, Joseph O. Carter and Harvey M. Wagner, assisted in the operation of the CPC and helped users to program their calculations. The first extensive calculations on the CPC were carried out by Howard Poulter for the solution of problems arising from his research in electronics for his doctoral dissertation.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 29% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1986 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Educational Experience with the IBM 650

JOHN G. HERRIOT

  (Image Omitted: © 1986 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Author's Address: Computer Science Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305. Categories and Subject Descriptors: C.1.1 [Processor Architectures], Single Stream Data Architectures; K.2 [History of Computing] -- hardware, IBM 650, people, software. General Terms: Design, Languages. Additional Key Words and Phrases: education. © 1986 AFIPS 0164-1239/86/010059-061

Educational Experience with the IBM 650

JOHN G. HERRIOT .00/00)

Editor's Note

Herriot traces the history of computing at Stanford University, beginning with the IBM CPC and extending through the life of the 650 there. Included are the names of many of the participants, among them George Forsythe, who is shown in a photograph standing next to a 650 with Herriot and Jeanetta Riding, a student.

When IBM was contemplating the introduction of the Educational Grant Plan for the 650 and other computers, I wanted to make a market survey. When I visited Stanford, I spoke with, among others, its president, Wallace Sterling; the provost, Frederick E. Terman; and professors Albert H. Bowker and John Herriot.

One might say that Stanford University fully entered the computer age when an IBM 650 computer was installed in January 1956. Even before this, the Stanford Computation Center had been established in March 1953. Following an agreement between Frederick E. Terman, dean of the School of Engineering, and Albert H. Bowker, professor of statistics and mathematics and director of the Applied Mathematics and Statistics Laboratory, funding of the Computation Center was guaranteed jointly by the Electronics Research Laboratories and the Applied Mathematics and Statistics Laboratory. The center was directed by Allen M. Peterson, an assistant professor of electrical engineering, and me, then an associate professor of mathematics. At that time an IBM Card- Programmed Calculator (CPC) was installed. Much useful computing for the solution of problems in engineering, physics, and other scientific fields was done on the CPC. Two graduate students, Joseph O. Carter and Harvey M. Wagner, assisted in the operation of the CPC and helped users to program their calculations. The first extensive calculations on the CPC were carried out by Howard Poulter for the...