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Programming Aids and Applications: The IBM MDDPM -- Some Recollections of a Great Machine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129496D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 8 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

BARRY GORDON: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

As I was organizing this issue and considering who the authors should be, the name of Barry Gordon was mentioned frequently. Gordon's name is well known partly because his contributions were so diversified. His ";Selective Tracing Routine"; was published as IBM's first ";Principles of Operation, Data Processing Bulletin"; in August 1955, and we reprint it here, with IBM's permission. Additional tracing or optimizing programs were presented at the August 1955 Computation Seminar discussed earlier in this section. Equitable Life Assurance Society printed Gordon's paper, ";IBM Type 650 Optimizing Program"; in June 1955 and a revised version in September. Gordon presented ";An Optimizing Program for the IBM 650"; to the Association for Computing Machinery in September 1955 and published it in the Journal of the ACM in January 1956 (Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 3-5). Gordon's ELI (Equitable Life Interpreter), of which we publish the contents and the first four pages, is in some sense comparable to the Wolontis-Bell interpreter, but was oriented to a more specific application. Most fascinating, though, is his discussion of preparing to use a machine he (and some of his instructors) had not yet seen.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1986 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Programming Aids and Applications: The IBM MDDPM -- Some Recollections of a Great Machine

BARRY GORDON

(Image Omitted: © 1986 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Author's Address: A45 West End Avenue, New- York' NY 10025. Categories and Subject Descriptors C.1.1 [Processor Architectures], Single Data Stream Architectures; K.2 [History of Computing] -- hardware, IBM 650, people, software. General Terms: Design. Additional Key Words and Phrases: Equitable Life Interpreter, programming aids. © 1986 AFIPS 0164-1239/86/010077-083

Programming Aids and Applications: The IBM MDDPM -- Some Recollections of a Great Machine

BARRY GORDON .00/00)

Editor's Note

As I was organizing this issue and considering who the authors should be, the name of Barry Gordon was mentioned frequently. Gordon's name is well known partly because his contributions were so diversified. His "Selective Tracing Routine" was published as IBM's first "Principles of Operation, Data Processing Bulletin" in August 1955, and we reprint it here, with IBM's permission. Additional tracing or optimizing programs were presented at the August 1955 Computation Seminar discussed earlier in this section.

Equitable Life Assurance Society printed Gordon's paper, "IBM Type 650 Optimizing Program" in June 1955 and a revised version in September. Gordon presented "An Optimizing Program for the IBM 650" to the Association for Computing Machinery in September 1955 and published it in the Journal of the ACM in January 1956 (Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 3-5).

Gordon's ELI (Equitable Life Interpreter), of which we publish the contents and the first four pages, is in some sense comparable to the Wolontis-Bell interpreter, but was oriented to a more specific application. Most fascinating, though, is his discussion of preparing to use a machine he (and some of his instructors) had not yet seen.

In my opinion, the history of IBM computers reveals three truly great machines, in terms of influence and impact: the 701, the 650, and the PC. The story of the 701 has already been told at some length; that of the PC is still unfolding; the 650, however, seems to be a story whose time has come.

IEEE Computer Society, Jan 01, 1986 Page 1 IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 8 Number 1, Pages 77-83

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Programming Aids and Applications: The IBM MDDPM -- Some Recollections of a G...