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Programming Aids and Applications: Epilog

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129499D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

CUTHBERT C. HURD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

During the year following the announcement of the 650, I worked hard to bring the 704 to fruition and to support T. V. Learson, director of Electronic Data Processing Machines (EDPM) at IBM. He had been named the ";EDPM Czar"; to assess the experience with the limited- production 702 and to decide how the company should meet increasing competition from Univac and other companies that were starting to threaten certain large IBM accounts. Following the 704 announcement in May 1954, and the 705 announcement in October 1954, Learson was promoted to vice-president of sales, and I was named director of EDPM. Charles R. De Carlo became director of Applied Science. O. E. Scott was named sales manager of Electric Accounting Machines. These two bore the major responsibility for introducing the 650. My task as director of EDPM was to coordinate all of the efforts of the company in computing. A specific challenge was to improve the 650 and to begin production of the 704 and 705 with the newest form of storage, magnetic cores. My second task was to address the great need for higher-performance magnetic tapes, drums, and printers. Third, we faced the need to begin the ";next generation"; using transistors -- an effort that resulted in Stretch. Because of these activities, I spent less and less time with the 650 program. Hence, the following comments are those of a somewhat detached observer.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1986 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Programming Aids and Applications: Epilog

CUTHBERT C. HURD

During the year following the announcement of the 650, I worked hard to bring the 704 to fruition and to support T. V. Learson, director of Electronic Data Processing Machines (EDPM) at IBM. He had been named the "EDPM Czar" to assess the experience with the limited- production 702 and to decide how the company should meet increasing competition from Univac and other companies that were starting to threaten certain large IBM accounts. Following the 704 announcement in May 1954, and the 705 announcement in October 1954, Learson was promoted to vice-president of sales, and I was named director of EDPM. Charles R. De Carlo became director of Applied Science. O. E. Scott was named sales manager of Electric Accounting Machines. These two bore the major responsibility for introducing the 650.

My task as director of EDPM was to coordinate all of the efforts of the company in computing. A specific challenge was to improve the 650 and to begin production of the 704 and 705 with the newest form of storage, magnetic cores. My second task was to address the great need for higher-performance magnetic tapes, drums, and printers. Third, we faced the need to begin the "next generation" using transistors -- an effort that resulted in Stretch. Because of these activities, I spent less and less time with the 650 program. Hence, the following comments are those of a somewhat detached observer.

Type 650 -- A Watershed

Peter F. Drucker, in his recent Innovation and Entrepreneurship (New York, Harper & Row, 1985), says, in effect, that IBM did not become the leader in the computer business because it had necessarily the best computer. Instead, IBM recognized that the uses of computers by businesspersons would exceed uses in the military and by scientists. Because of increasing use of the 650 by business, the 650 was the watershed from the 701 to the 705 series in terms of applications and professional background of programmers. Thus the 701 w...