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IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 8 Number 2 -- Front Matter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129500D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

IEEE Computer Society: OWNER

Abstract

This issue of the Annals has an unusual variety of articles, ranging from the origins of the computer industry in Japan, to the creation of the International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP), to the role of advertising in informing the public about computers. This kind of diversity impresses on us the scope of our field and the variety of forces that shape it. Sigeru Takahashi, a major participant in the computer field, writes about transistor computers in Japan, and clearly shows the role of a small number of industrial organizations and institutes in providing the leadership for the now rapid development in Japan. In spite of being a great distance from other centers of research and development, the pioneers of Japan managed to find the components and the knowledge to build their own computers -- and then an industry. Microprogramming took a long time to be appreciated, but now it is pervasive throughout the computer field. Maurice Wilkes is generally credited with coming up with the idea of microprogramming, and then convincing manufacturers to incorporate it into their systems. As we see in two articles from the early 1950s reprinted here, the ideas were clearly presented, but we didn't find microprogramming in commercial computers until much later. Wilkes has written a retrospective overview for us, with the insight and hindsight of the intervening years.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1986 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Annals of the History of Computing Volume 8 Number 2 April 1986 [Front Matter]

Contents About this Issue Bernard A. Galler.....115

Articles The Genesis of Microprogramming - M. V. Wilkes.....116 Two 1951-1952 papers tell
how the author envisioned computer structures to permit microprogramming

Marketing the Monster: Advertising Computer Technology - William Aspray and Donald deB. Beaver.....127 How advertisements reflected changing perspectives of computers between 1950
and 1980

Early Transistor Computers in Japan - Sigeru Takahashi.....144 The work of the Electronics
Division of the Electrotechnical Laboratory (ETL) in the 1950s

System/360: A Retrospective View - B. O. Evans.....155 A personal look at the development and
consequences of IBM's shift to compatible hardware and software

The Start of IFIP -- Personal Recollections - Isaac L. Auerbach.....180 The founding and early
years of the International Federation for Information Processing

Departments Notices.....193

Self-Study Questions.....194

Anecdotes.....195 Computing Capacity - Walter M. Carlson

Comments, Queries, and Debate.....198 Los Angeles ACM Chapter - Roger L. Mills

Reviews.....199 W. Aspray, "Should the Term Fifth Generation Computers Be Banned?" - K. W.
Smillie C. A. Deavours & L. Kruh "Machine Cryptography and Modern Cryptanalysis" - Ralph Erskine [Material omitted]

About this Issue

This issue of the Annals has an unusual variety of articles, ranging from the origins of the computer industry in Japan, to the creation of the International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP), to the role of advertising in informing the public about computers. This kind of diversity impresses on us the scope of our field and the variety of forces that shape it.

Sigeru Takahashi, a major participant in the computer field, writes about transistor computers in Japan, and clearly shows the role of a small number of industrial organizations and institutes in providing the leadership for the now rapid development in Japan. In spite of being a great distance from other centers of research and development, the pioneers of Japan managed to find the components and the knowledge to build their own computers -- and then an industry.

Microprogramming took a long time to be appreciated, but now it is pervasive throughout the computer field. Maurice Wilkes i...