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Early Transistor Computers in Japan

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129505D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 12 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

SIGERU TAKAHASHI: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The paper describes the history of the early development of transistor computers in Japan. Because the paper pertains mostly to the Electronics Division of the Electrotechnical Laboratory, the author begins with the establishment of this division. He then explores the development of the ETL Mark III, which used point-contact transistors, and the ETL Mark IV, which was followed by various commercial products. En Mark IV technology was also employed for ";Yamato, "; a special-purpose machine that was developed in 1959 for the first trial of English-Japanese machine translation.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 8% of the total text.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1986 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Early Transistor Computers in Japan

SIGERU TAKAHASHI

  (Image Omitted: © 1986 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. Most of this article was translated from an article that appeared in the Journal of the Information Processing Society of Japan (Vol. 17, No. 2, February 1976, pp. 133-141), with the kind permission of the society. Author's Address: 6132-4, Midorigaoka, Zama 228, Japan. © 1986 AFIPS 0164-1239/86/020144-154

Early Transistor Computers in Japan

SIGERU TAKAHASHI .00/00)

The paper describes the history of the early development of transistor computers in Japan. Because the paper pertains mostly to the Electronics Division of the Electrotechnical Laboratory, the author begins with the establishment of this division. He then explores the development of the ETL Mark III, which used point-contact transistors, and the ETL Mark IV, which was followed by various commercial products. En Mark IV technology was also employed for "Yamato, " a special-purpose machine that was developed in 1959 for the first trial of English-Japanese machine translation.

Categories and Subject Descriptors: K.2 [History of Computing] -- En Mark III, ETL Mark IV, hardware, people, software, Yamato General Terms: Design Additional Key Words and Phrases: Electrotechnical Laboratory (Japan), transistors

1. Introduction

An article in the Annals by the late Hidetosi Takahasi (1980), entitled "Some Important Computers of Japanese Design," described early Japanese computers with the use of parametron technologies in some detail. His article only briefly mentioned computers developed by the Japanese government's Electrotechnical Laboratory (ETL), the ETL Mark III and IV. This is not surprising because he was the leader of the "parametron" school, and not very familiar with what happened in the "transistor" school. In this article I wish to describe some early transistor computers developed by ETL that played as important a role as parametron computers in the history of Japanese computers.

In Japan, computers utilizing transistors were developed by the government's ETL in the latter half of the 1950s. The technology was transferred to several Japanese manufacturers and was widely used for their early products in parallel with parametron technology. Because of rapid technological development in this field, however, both technologies became obsole...