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The Start of IFIP -- Personal Recollections

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129507D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 12 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

ISAAC L. AUERBACH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP) had its start with the suggestion, in November 1955, of an international conference on information processing. In those days we were constantly talking about the state of the art of computers as if all of the developments were taking place in the United States, while little or nothing was happening elsewhere in the world. I suggested then that an international meeting at which computer scientists and engineers from many nations of the world might exchange information about the state of the computer art would be interesting and potentially valuable. I expressed the hope that we could benefit from knowledge of what was happening in other parts of the world, and that our European and Japanese colleagues could definitely gain from knowing about developments in the United States. The idea was strongly endorsed, and my colleagues suggested that I present it to the National Joint Computer Committee (NJCC) for consideration. The NJCC was composed of four representatives from each of the three professional societies: the Professional Group on Electronic Computers (PGEC) of the Institute of Radio Engineers (IRE), the Committee on Computing Devices of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE), and the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1986 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

The Start of IFIP -- Personal Recollections

ISAAC L. AUERBACH

(Image Omitted: © 1986 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the AFIPS copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires specific permission. This article is extracted, with permission? from "Personal Recollections on the Origin of IFIP." In H. Zemanek (ed.),A Quarter Century of IFIP: The IFIP Silver Summor, Amsterdam, Elsevier (North-Holland), © IFIP, 1986. Categories and Subject Descriptors: K.2 [History of Computing] -- people; K.7 [The Computing Profession] -- IFIP, Organizations. General Terms: Management. Additional Key Words and phrases: AFIPS. Author's Address: 900 Centennial Road, Narberth, PA 19072. © 1986 AFIPS 0164-

1239/86/020180-192

The Start of IFIP -- Personal Recollections

ISAAC L. AUERBACH .00/00)

The International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP) had its start with the suggestion, in November 1955, of an international conference on information processing. In those days we were constantly talking about the state of the art of computers as if all of the developments were taking place in the United States, while little or nothing was happening elsewhere in the world. I suggested then that an international meeting at which computer scientists and engineers from many nations of the world might exchange information about the state of the computer art would be interesting and potentially valuable. I expressed the hope that we could benefit from knowledge of what was happening in other parts of the world, and that our European and Japanese colleagues could definitely gain from knowing about developments in the United States. The idea was strongly endorsed, and my colleagues suggested that I present it to the National Joint Computer Committee (NJCC) for consideration. The NJCC was composed of four representatives from each of the three professional societies: the Professional Group on Electronic Computers (PGEC) of the Institute of Radio Engineers (IRE), the Committee on Computing Devices of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE), and the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

I presented my idea to the NJCC, and the chairman appointed me to chair an ad hoc committee to develop the idea and bring it back for subsequent discussion. The committee included Samuel N. Alexander of the National Bureau of Standards, representing AIEE, and Alston S. Householder of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory...