Browse Prior Art Database

Automated Secondary Storage Management

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129532D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 8 page(s) / 96K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

F. B. MacKenzie: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

During the past several years, the idea has been advanced that the management of secondary storage should be handled automatically by the computing system. Basic trends in computing system design dictate that automatic management must be provided if the design objectives are to be practically realized. These trends are well noted elsewhere.";

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1987 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Automated Secondary Storage Management

F. B. MacKenzie

(Image Omitted: "Automated Secondary Storage Management" was published in Datamation, Vol. 11, No. 11, November 1965, pages 24-28. It is reprinted here with permission of DATAMATION ® Magazine, copyright by Technical Publishing Co, 1965 -- all rights reserved.

   "Design of a Scientific Computing Facility," Wagner and Granholm, Proceedings of IFIP Congress 65, page 288: " ... The requirements of general purpose executives and multicomputer, multistore Continuous Flow Systems, together with the great growth in higher level languages, all will bring powerful pressures to bear on this problem ... ")

During the past several years, the idea has been advanced that the management of secondary storage should be handled automatically by the computing system. Basic trends in computing system design dictate that automatic management must be provided if the design objectives are to be practically realized. These trends are well noted elsewhere."

The use of the term "computing system" here refers to an operational coupling of hardware and a higher-level-language programming system. The application programmer should view his entire computing system as a machine. As such, it has gross properties with which he should become familiar. The structure of the hardware- language programs is implied by his higher- level language usage. That he should achieve the necessary familiarity becomes more evident as these programs come ever closer to: 1. exceeding the physical memory capacity of his "machine's" hardware component, or 2. being economically unfeasible because of excessive running times.

The Single Level Store

Many names have been applied to suggest the concept of automatic secondary store management, especially the term "single level store." The use of such names implies that secondary memory stores exist and are used by the computing system as back-up to its primary memory store. Program segments and internal data are moved about, as necessary, between the primary and secondary stores on demand -- as these demands are detected by the computing system. The application programmer need think only in terms of the logical space requirements of the programs and their data. He does not explicitly direct movements between the different memory levels. Computing system action to use the backing store is automatically invoked if an execution situation arises in which logical space requirements cannot be satisfied in the primary store alone.

Automatic secondary store management is provided by the Burroughs B 5500 computing system. This article explains the operation of the basic control mechanism employed in the computing system to invoke the store management process, and reports observations which demonstrate its effectiveness.

The disc...