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Biographies: The Computer and Information Systems Program at Dartmouth College (CIS), died on June 30, 1988, after a short but turbulent nine-year life

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129601D
Original Publication Date: 1988-Mar-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Thomas E. Kurtz: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Dartmouth College Hanover, NH CIS was born in 1979 to prepare students for business and industry careers. Its two-year curriculum combined managerial and technical requirements in equal proportion leading to a professional masters degree. Despite a generous (one-half million dollars) startup grant from IBM, the program was afflicted from the start with various maladies. Being a hybrid, its graduates, although well-trained by any objective measure, were neither technical (like computer science graduates) nor managerial (like MBA graduates), thus confusing personnel directors and others. Its necessarily interim status as a new program did not allow adequate fund-raising to assure its long-run health. The rapidly changing technology discouraged wide agreement on what should be taught. Finally, CIS did not have a congenial home within the host institution -- it started and ended its life in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences; the School of Engineering or the School of Business would have been more healthful. It is survived by 121 graduates, and similar programs at other institutions for which it served as a partial model. Requiescat in Pacem.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1989 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Biographies: The Computer and Information Systems Program at Dartmouth College (CIS), died on June 30, 1988, after a short but turbulent nine-year life.

Thomas E. Kurtz

Dartmouth College Hanover, NH

CIS was born in 1979 to prepare students for business and industry careers. Its two-year curriculum combined managerial and technical requirements in equal proportion leading to a professional masters degree. Despite a generous (one-half million dollars) startup grant from IBM, the program was afflicted from the start with various maladies. Being a hybrid, its graduates, although well-trained by any objective measure, were neither technical (like computer science graduates) nor managerial (like MBA graduates), thus confusing personnel directors and others. Its necessarily interim status as a new program did not allow adequate fund-raising to assure its long-run health. The rapidly changing technology discouraged wide agreement on what should be taught. Finally, CIS did not have a congenial home within the host institution -- it started and ended its life in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences; the School of Engineering or the School of Business would have been more healthful.

It is survived by 121 graduates, and similar programs at other institutions for which it served as a partial model. Requiescat...