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Comments, Queries, and Debate: The University of Michigan's B-5000 Decision

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129625D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Bernard A. Galler: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Computing Center University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 USA In a recent letter (Annals, Vol. 10, No. 2, 1988, pp. 143144) Saul Rosen is concerned with the Burroughs B-5000 discussion which appeared earlier (Annals, Vol. 9, No. 1, 1987, pp. 37-92). In his letter, Dr. Rosen calls my statement about the University of Michigan's decision not to order a B-5000 a ";cop-out."; He argues that this computer would not have solved our ";large-scale scientific computing"; needs, and that my statement about our inability to change the operating system could not have been the reason for not ordering the machine. I have checked with my colleague at that time, Bruce Arden, and his recollection agrees with mine. We never got to the stage of considering how well the B-5000 might have handled our computational load. We had always been in control of the operating system on the University of Michigan's mainframes, and we were not about to consider a computer which was closed to us in that respect.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1989 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Comments, Queries, and Debate: The University of Michigan's B-5000 Decision

Bernard A. Galler

Computing Center University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 USA

In a recent letter (Annals, Vol. 10, No. 2, 1988, pp. 143144) Saul Rosen is concerned with the Burroughs B-5000 discussion which appeared earlier (Annals, Vol. 9, No. 1, 1987, pp. 37-92). In his letter, Dr. Rosen calls my statement about the University of Michigan's decision not to order a B-5000 a "cop-out." He argues that this computer would not have solved our "large-scale scientific computing" needs, and that my statement about our inability to change the operating system could not have been the reason for not ordering the machine.

I have checked with my colleague at that time, Bruce Arden, and his recollection agrees with mine. We never got to the stage of considering how well the B-5000 might have handled our computational load. We had always been in control of the operating system on the University of Michigan's mainframes, and we were not about to consider a computer which was closed to us in that respect.

I stand, therefore, with my recollection as reported earlier, notwithstanding Dr. Rosen's interpretation of it.

IEEE Computer Society, Jun 30, 1989 Page 1 IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 11 Number 3, Page 22...